Self-liking and self-competence separate self-evaluation from self-deception: Associations with personality, ability, and achievement

Raymond A. Mar, Colin G. Deyoung, Daniel M. Higgins, Jordan B. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The similarities between measures of self-evaluation and self-deception are reviewed, and a method for discriminating between them is proposed, using personality profiles and relations to ability and achievement. Across two samples, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and Tafarodi's measures of self-evaluation were used to demonstrate that the RSES and Self-Liking are more similar to Self-Deceptive Enhancement than is self-competence. Further, Self-Competence is uniquely associated with cognitive ability and both academic and creative achievement. It is concluded that, along with self-liking, self-competence is a useful form of self-evaluation that should be measured and taken into account in research that has traditionally focused on self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1047-1078
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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