Self-efficacy and outcome expectancy in beginning weight training class: Their relations to students' behavioral intention and actual behavior

Zan Gao, Ping Xiang, Amelia M. Lee, Louis Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study was an initial attempt to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, behavioral intention, and actual behavior over time in a beginning weight training class. A total of 109 participants completed questionnaires assessing their self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and intentions for future weight training. Their attendance and workout logs were calculated as a measure of actual behavior. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive relationships among all the variables during both program periods. Multiple regression analyses indicated that outcome expectancy initially played a more important role than self-efficacy in predicting behavioral intention and actual behavior. However, self-efficacy appeared more influential at midprogram. Findings of this study can enhance our understanding of the determining factors for individuals' motivated behaviors in college physical activity classes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-100
Number of pages9
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Midprogram
  • Motivation
  • Physical activity
  • Program outset

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