Seeking Cancer-Related Information From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Cancer Patients

Nehama Lewis, Lourdes S. Martinez, Derek R. Freres, J. Sanford Schwartz, Katrina Armstrong, Stacy W. Gray, Taressa Fraze, Rebekah H. Nagler, Angel Bourgoin, Robert C. Hornik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Previous research suggests positive effects of health information seeking on prevention behaviors such as diet, exercise, and fruit and vegetable consumption among the general population. The current study builds upon this research by examining the effect of cancer patients' active information seeking from media and (nonmedical) interpersonal sources on fruit and vegetable consumption. The results of this longitudinal study are based on data collected from a randomly drawn sample from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, comprising breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients who completed mail surveys in the fall of 2006 and 2007. There was a 65% response rate for baseline subjects (resulting n = 2013); of those, 1,293 were interviewed one year later and 845 were available for final analyses. We used multiple imputation to replace missing data and propensity scoring to adjust for effects of possible confounders. There is a positive effect of information seeking at baseline on fruit and vegetable servings at follow-up; seekers consumed 0.43 (95% CI: 0.28 to 0.58) daily servings more than nonseekers adjusting for baseline consumption and other confounders. Active information seeking from media and interpersonal sources may lead to improved nutrition among the cancer patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-388
Number of pages9
JournalHealth communication
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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Vegetables
Fruits
vegetables
Fruit
cancer
Nutrition
Neoplasms
Postal Service
Research
Population
Longitudinal Studies
Registries
mail survey
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
health information
Health
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Diet

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Lewis, N., Martinez, L. S., Freres, D. R., Schwartz, J. S., Armstrong, K., Gray, S. W., ... Hornik, R. C. (2012). Seeking Cancer-Related Information From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Cancer Patients. Health communication, 27(4), 380-388. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2011.586990

Seeking Cancer-Related Information From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Cancer Patients. / Lewis, Nehama; Martinez, Lourdes S.; Freres, Derek R.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Armstrong, Katrina; Gray, Stacy W.; Fraze, Taressa; Nagler, Rebekah H.; Bourgoin, Angel; Hornik, Robert C.

In: Health communication, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.05.2012, p. 380-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, N, Martinez, LS, Freres, DR, Schwartz, JS, Armstrong, K, Gray, SW, Fraze, T, Nagler, RH, Bourgoin, A & Hornik, RC 2012, 'Seeking Cancer-Related Information From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Cancer Patients', Health communication, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 380-388. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2011.586990
Lewis, Nehama ; Martinez, Lourdes S. ; Freres, Derek R. ; Schwartz, J. Sanford ; Armstrong, Katrina ; Gray, Stacy W. ; Fraze, Taressa ; Nagler, Rebekah H. ; Bourgoin, Angel ; Hornik, Robert C. / Seeking Cancer-Related Information From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Cancer Patients. In: Health communication. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 380-388.
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