Sedentary time and vigorous physical activity are independently associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in middle school youth

Justin B. Moore, Michael W. Beets, Daheia J. Barr-Anderson, Kelly R. Evenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time, and cardiorespiratory fitness in a diverse sample of youth. Participants were recruited from three middle schools and completed assessments of height, weight, cardiorespiratory fitness, and wore an accelerometer for a minimum of four days. Hierarchical general linear models controlling for age, body mass index (BMI) percentile, and sex were used to evaluate the association of time (minutes per day) spent sedentary, and in moderate physical activity and vigorous physical activity with cardiorespiratory fitness (i.e., heart rate response [beats per minute], dependent variable). Results indicated age (β = -0.16, P < 0.05), BMI percentile (β = 0.33, P <0.05), being male (β = 0.17, P < 0.05), sedentary time (β = 0.11, P <0.05), moderate (β = -0.03, P > 0.05) and vigorous (β = -0.22, P < 0.05) physical activity explained 29% of the variance in cardiorespiratory fitness. Evaluation of fitness among high sedentary/high vigorous, high sedentary/low vigorous, low sedentary/low vigorous, and low sedentary/high vigorous groups (defined by the median split) showed that high levels of vigorous activity removed the detrimental effect of high levels of sedentary time on cardiorespiratory fitness. These analyses suggest that the negative impact of sedentary time can be mitigated by engaging in vigorous activity. © 2013

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1520-1525
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume31
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Exercise
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Heart Rate
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • accelerometer
  • fitness
  • physical activity
  • sedentary
  • youth

Cite this

Sedentary time and vigorous physical activity are independently associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in middle school youth. / Moore, Justin B.; Beets, Michael W.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Evenson, Kelly R.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 14, 01.10.2013, p. 1520-1525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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