Secular trends in weight status and weight-related attitudes and behaviors in adolescents from 1999 to 2010

Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Melanie M. Wall, Nicole Larson, Mary Story, Jayne A. Fulkerson, Marla E. Eisenberg, Peter J. Hannan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine secular trends from 1999 to 2010 in weight status and weight-related attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional design was used. Participants were from Minneapolis/St. Paul middle schools and high schools and included 3072 adolescents in 1999 (mean age14.6 ± 1.8) and 2793 adolescents in 2010 (mean age14.4 ± 2.0). Trends in weight-related variables were examined using inverse probability weighting to control for changes in socio-demographics over time. Results: The prevalence of obesity among boys increased by 7.8% from 1999 to 2010, with large ethnic/racial disparities. In black boys the prevalence of obesity increased from 14.4% to 21.5% and among Hispanic boys, obesity prevalence increased from 19.7% to 33.6%. Trends were more positive among girls: weight status did not significantly increase, perceptions of overweight status were more accurate, the use of healthy weight control behaviors remained high, dieting decreased by 6.7%, unhealthy weight control behaviors decreased by 8.2% and extreme weight control behaviors decreased by 4.5%. Conclusions: Trends indicate a need to intensify efforts to prevent obesity and other weight-related problems, particularly for boys from ethnic/racial minorities. The decreases in unhealthy weight control behaviors among girls are encouraging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-81
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Dieting
  • Obesity
  • Racial disparities
  • Secular trends
  • Weight control

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