Secular trends in fast-food restaurant use among adolescents and maternal caregivers from 1999 to 2010

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Abstract

Objectives. We examined trends from 1999 to 2010 in adolescents' self-reported fast-food restaurant use alongsidematernal reports of fast-food consumption and purchasing from restaurants for family meals. Methods. Middle- and high-school student participants from Minneapolis- St Paul, Minnesota, represented diverse ethnic/racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Adolescents completed classroom-administered surveys and maternal caregivers responded by phone or mail. Results. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption, defined as 3 or more times per week, decreased from 1999 to 2010 among adolescents (1999: 25%; 2010: 19%; P < .001) and maternal caregivers (1999: 17%; 2010: 11%; P < .001), but sociodemographic disparities were apparent. For example, the prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption remained highest and did not significantly decrease among Black or Native American youths. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food purchases for family meals did not significantly decrease; large decreases were observed only among Hispanic families (1999: 18%; 2010: 6%; P < .001). Conclusions. In light of previous findings linking frequent fast-food consumption to greater weight gain and poor nutrition, the observed decreases in consumption are encouraging and interventions are needed to address observed disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e62-e69
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume104
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

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Fast Foods
Restaurants
Caregivers
Mothers
Meals
North American Indians
Postal Service
Hispanic Americans
Weight Gain
Students

Cite this

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title = "Secular trends in fast-food restaurant use among adolescents and maternal caregivers from 1999 to 2010",
abstract = "Objectives. We examined trends from 1999 to 2010 in adolescents' self-reported fast-food restaurant use alongsidematernal reports of fast-food consumption and purchasing from restaurants for family meals. Methods. Middle- and high-school student participants from Minneapolis- St Paul, Minnesota, represented diverse ethnic/racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Adolescents completed classroom-administered surveys and maternal caregivers responded by phone or mail. Results. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption, defined as 3 or more times per week, decreased from 1999 to 2010 among adolescents (1999: 25{\%}; 2010: 19{\%}; P < .001) and maternal caregivers (1999: 17{\%}; 2010: 11{\%}; P < .001), but sociodemographic disparities were apparent. For example, the prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption remained highest and did not significantly decrease among Black or Native American youths. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food purchases for family meals did not significantly decrease; large decreases were observed only among Hispanic families (1999: 18{\%}; 2010: 6{\%}; P < .001). Conclusions. In light of previous findings linking frequent fast-food consumption to greater weight gain and poor nutrition, the observed decreases in consumption are encouraging and interventions are needed to address observed disparities.",
author = "Nicole Larson and Hannan, {Peter J.} and Fulkerson, {Jayne A.} and Laska, {Melissa N.} and Eisenberg, {Marla E.} and Dianne Neumark-Sztainer",
year = "2014",
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doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2013.301805",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "104",
pages = "e62--e69",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Secular trends in fast-food restaurant use among adolescents and maternal caregivers from 1999 to 2010

AU - Larson, Nicole

AU - Hannan, Peter J.

AU - Fulkerson, Jayne A.

AU - Laska, Melissa N.

AU - Eisenberg, Marla E.

AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

PY - 2014/5

Y1 - 2014/5

N2 - Objectives. We examined trends from 1999 to 2010 in adolescents' self-reported fast-food restaurant use alongsidematernal reports of fast-food consumption and purchasing from restaurants for family meals. Methods. Middle- and high-school student participants from Minneapolis- St Paul, Minnesota, represented diverse ethnic/racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Adolescents completed classroom-administered surveys and maternal caregivers responded by phone or mail. Results. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption, defined as 3 or more times per week, decreased from 1999 to 2010 among adolescents (1999: 25%; 2010: 19%; P < .001) and maternal caregivers (1999: 17%; 2010: 11%; P < .001), but sociodemographic disparities were apparent. For example, the prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption remained highest and did not significantly decrease among Black or Native American youths. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food purchases for family meals did not significantly decrease; large decreases were observed only among Hispanic families (1999: 18%; 2010: 6%; P < .001). Conclusions. In light of previous findings linking frequent fast-food consumption to greater weight gain and poor nutrition, the observed decreases in consumption are encouraging and interventions are needed to address observed disparities.

AB - Objectives. We examined trends from 1999 to 2010 in adolescents' self-reported fast-food restaurant use alongsidematernal reports of fast-food consumption and purchasing from restaurants for family meals. Methods. Middle- and high-school student participants from Minneapolis- St Paul, Minnesota, represented diverse ethnic/racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Adolescents completed classroom-administered surveys and maternal caregivers responded by phone or mail. Results. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption, defined as 3 or more times per week, decreased from 1999 to 2010 among adolescents (1999: 25%; 2010: 19%; P < .001) and maternal caregivers (1999: 17%; 2010: 11%; P < .001), but sociodemographic disparities were apparent. For example, the prevalence of frequent fast-food consumption remained highest and did not significantly decrease among Black or Native American youths. The overall prevalence of frequent fast-food purchases for family meals did not significantly decrease; large decreases were observed only among Hispanic families (1999: 18%; 2010: 6%; P < .001). Conclusions. In light of previous findings linking frequent fast-food consumption to greater weight gain and poor nutrition, the observed decreases in consumption are encouraging and interventions are needed to address observed disparities.

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