School quality and the education-health relationship: Evidence from Blacks in segregated schools

David Frisvold, Ezra Golberstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we estimate the effect of school quality on the relationship between schooling and health outcomes using the substantial improvements in the quality of schools attended by black students in the segregated southern states during the mid-1900s as a source of identifying variation. Using data from the National Health Interview Survey, our results suggest that improvements in school quality, measured as the pupil-teacher ratio, average teachers' wage, and length of the school year, amplify the beneficial effects of education on several measures of health in later life, including self-rated health, smoking, obesity, and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1232-1245
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Education
  • Health status
  • School quality

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