School Obesity Prevention Policies and Practices in Minnesota and Student Outcomes: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

Marilyn S. Nanney, Richard F. MacLehose, Martha Y. Kubik, Cynthia S. Davey, Michael J. O'Connell, Katherine Y. Grannon, Toben F. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The School Obesity-related Policy Evaluation (ScOPE) Study uses existing public surveillance data and applies a rigorous study design to evaluate effectiveness of school policies and practices impacting student behavioral and weight outcomes. Methods The ScOPE Study used a cohort of 50 combined junior−senior and high schools in Minnesota to evaluate the change in weight-related policy environments in 2006 and 2012 and test the effect of policy change on students attending those schools in 2007 and 2013. Exposure variables included school practices about foods and beverages available in school vending machines and school stores, physical education requirements, and intramural opportunities. Primary study outcomes were average school-level ninth grade student BMI percentile, obesity prevalence, daily servings of fruits/vegetables, and daily glasses of soda. Results Availability of fruits/vegetables in schools was associated with a significant increase in total daily intake among ninth grade students by 0.4 servings. Availability of soda in schools was associated with a significant increase in total daily intake among ninth grade boys by 0.5 servings. Less-healthy snack and drink availability in schools was associated with a small, significant increase (1%) in student BMI percentile at the school level. Conclusions Use of a school-level longitudinal cohort study design over a 6-year period uniquely adds to the methodologic rigor of school policy and practice evaluation studies. The ScOPE Study provides marginal evidence that school policies and practices, especially those that restrict vending and school store offerings, may have small effects on weight status among ninth grade students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)656-663
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Students
Weights and Measures
Vegetables
Fruit
Food and Beverages
Snacks
Physical Education and Training
Glass

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School Obesity Prevention Policies and Practices in Minnesota and Student Outcomes : A Longitudinal Cohort Study. / Nanney, Marilyn S.; MacLehose, Richard F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Davey, Cynthia S.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Grannon, Katherine Y.; Nelson, Toben F.

In: American journal of preventive medicine, Vol. 51, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 656-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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