Ruthenium-catalyzed photo cross-linking of fibrin-based engineered tissue

Jason W. Bjork, Sandra L. Johnson, Robert T Tranquillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most cross-linking methods utilize chemistry or physical processes that are detrimental to cells and tissue development. Those that are not as harmful often do not provide a level of strength that ultimately meets the required application. The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of a ruthenium-sodium persulfate cross-linking system to form dityrosine in fibrin-based engineered tissue. By utilizing the tyrosine residues inherent to fibrin and cell-deposited proteins, at least 3-fold mechanical strength increases and 10-fold stiffness increases were achieved after cross-linking. This strengthening and stiffening effect was found to increase with culture duration prior to cross-linking such that physiologically relevant properties were obtained. Fibrin was not required for this effect as demonstrated by testing with collagen-based engineered tissue. Cross-linked tissues were implanted subcutaneously and shown to have minimal inflammation after 30 days, similar to non-cross-linked controls. Overall, the method employed is rapid, non-toxic, minimally inflammatory, and is capable of increasing strength and stiffness of engineered tissues to physiological levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2479-2488
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

Fingerprint

Ruthenium
Fibrin
Tissue
Chemical Phenomena
Stiffness
Collagen
Strength of materials
Tyrosine
Sodium
Inflammation
Proteins
Testing

Keywords

  • Arterial tissue engineering
  • Cross-linking
  • Dityrosine
  • Fibrin
  • Fibroblast

Cite this

Ruthenium-catalyzed photo cross-linking of fibrin-based engineered tissue. / Bjork, Jason W.; Johnson, Sandra L.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 32, No. 10, 01.04.2011, p. 2479-2488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bjork, Jason W. ; Johnson, Sandra L. ; Tranquillo, Robert T. / Ruthenium-catalyzed photo cross-linking of fibrin-based engineered tissue. In: Biomaterials. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 10. pp. 2479-2488.
@article{4fc79d4a82ee43e6b7a1f094c397957f,
title = "Ruthenium-catalyzed photo cross-linking of fibrin-based engineered tissue",
abstract = "Most cross-linking methods utilize chemistry or physical processes that are detrimental to cells and tissue development. Those that are not as harmful often do not provide a level of strength that ultimately meets the required application. The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of a ruthenium-sodium persulfate cross-linking system to form dityrosine in fibrin-based engineered tissue. By utilizing the tyrosine residues inherent to fibrin and cell-deposited proteins, at least 3-fold mechanical strength increases and 10-fold stiffness increases were achieved after cross-linking. This strengthening and stiffening effect was found to increase with culture duration prior to cross-linking such that physiologically relevant properties were obtained. Fibrin was not required for this effect as demonstrated by testing with collagen-based engineered tissue. Cross-linked tissues were implanted subcutaneously and shown to have minimal inflammation after 30 days, similar to non-cross-linked controls. Overall, the method employed is rapid, non-toxic, minimally inflammatory, and is capable of increasing strength and stiffness of engineered tissues to physiological levels.",
keywords = "Arterial tissue engineering, Cross-linking, Dityrosine, Fibrin, Fibroblast",
author = "Bjork, {Jason W.} and Johnson, {Sandra L.} and Tranquillo, {Robert T}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.12.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "2479--2488",
journal = "Biomaterials",
issn = "0142-9612",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ruthenium-catalyzed photo cross-linking of fibrin-based engineered tissue

AU - Bjork, Jason W.

AU - Johnson, Sandra L.

AU - Tranquillo, Robert T

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Most cross-linking methods utilize chemistry or physical processes that are detrimental to cells and tissue development. Those that are not as harmful often do not provide a level of strength that ultimately meets the required application. The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of a ruthenium-sodium persulfate cross-linking system to form dityrosine in fibrin-based engineered tissue. By utilizing the tyrosine residues inherent to fibrin and cell-deposited proteins, at least 3-fold mechanical strength increases and 10-fold stiffness increases were achieved after cross-linking. This strengthening and stiffening effect was found to increase with culture duration prior to cross-linking such that physiologically relevant properties were obtained. Fibrin was not required for this effect as demonstrated by testing with collagen-based engineered tissue. Cross-linked tissues were implanted subcutaneously and shown to have minimal inflammation after 30 days, similar to non-cross-linked controls. Overall, the method employed is rapid, non-toxic, minimally inflammatory, and is capable of increasing strength and stiffness of engineered tissues to physiological levels.

AB - Most cross-linking methods utilize chemistry or physical processes that are detrimental to cells and tissue development. Those that are not as harmful often do not provide a level of strength that ultimately meets the required application. The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of a ruthenium-sodium persulfate cross-linking system to form dityrosine in fibrin-based engineered tissue. By utilizing the tyrosine residues inherent to fibrin and cell-deposited proteins, at least 3-fold mechanical strength increases and 10-fold stiffness increases were achieved after cross-linking. This strengthening and stiffening effect was found to increase with culture duration prior to cross-linking such that physiologically relevant properties were obtained. Fibrin was not required for this effect as demonstrated by testing with collagen-based engineered tissue. Cross-linked tissues were implanted subcutaneously and shown to have minimal inflammation after 30 days, similar to non-cross-linked controls. Overall, the method employed is rapid, non-toxic, minimally inflammatory, and is capable of increasing strength and stiffness of engineered tissues to physiological levels.

KW - Arterial tissue engineering

KW - Cross-linking

KW - Dityrosine

KW - Fibrin

KW - Fibroblast

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79251595010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79251595010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.12.010

DO - 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.12.010

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 2479

EP - 2488

JO - Biomaterials

JF - Biomaterials

SN - 0142-9612

IS - 10

ER -