Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease

Mariano Sanz, David Beighton, Michael A. Curtis, Jaime A. Cury, Irene Dige, Henrik Dommisch, Roger Ellwood, Rodrigo Giacaman, David Herrera, Mark C. Herzberg, Eija Könönen, Philip D. Marsh, Joerg Meyle, Alex Mira, Ana Molina, Andrea Mombelli, Marc Quirynen, Eric C. Reynolds, Lior Shapira, Egija Zaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: The scope of this working group was to review (1) ecological interactions at the dental biofilm in health and disease, (2) the role of microbial communities in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and caries, and (3) the innate host response in caries and periodontal diseases. Results and Conclusions: A health-associated biofilm includes genera such as Neisseria, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Veillonella and Granulicatella. Microorganisms associated with both caries and periodontal diseases are metabolically highly specialized and organized as multispecies microbial biofilms. Progression of these diseases involves multiple microbial interactions driven by different stressors. In caries, the exposure of dental biofilms to dietary sugars and their fermentation to organic acids results in increasing proportions of acidogenic and aciduric species. In gingivitis, plaque accumulation at the gingival margin leads to inflammation and increasing proportions of proteolytic and often obligately anaerobic species. The natural mucosal barriers and saliva are the main innate defence mechanisms against soft tissue bacterial invasion. Similarly, enamel and dentin are important hard tissue barriers to the caries process. Given that the present state of knowledge suggests that the aetiologies of caries and periodontal diseases are mutually independent, the elements of innate immunity that appear to contribute to resistance to both are somewhat coincidental.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S5-S11
JournalJournal of clinical periodontology
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Stomatognathic Diseases
Oral Health
Dental Caries
Periodontal Diseases
Biofilms
Joints
Education
Veillonella
Dietary Sucrose
Microbial Interactions
Neisseria
Actinomyces
Gingivitis
Periodontitis
Health
Dentin
Dental Enamel
Streptococcus
Saliva
Innate Immunity

Keywords

  • caries
  • dental biofilm
  • dysbiosis
  • innate host responses
  • microbial interactions
  • periodontal diseases
  • symbiosis

Cite this

Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease. / Sanz, Mariano; Beighton, David; Curtis, Michael A.; Cury, Jaime A.; Dige, Irene; Dommisch, Henrik; Ellwood, Roger; Giacaman, Rodrigo; Herrera, David; Herzberg, Mark C.; Könönen, Eija; Marsh, Philip D.; Meyle, Joerg; Mira, Alex; Molina, Ana; Mombelli, Andrea; Quirynen, Marc; Reynolds, Eric C.; Shapira, Lior; Zaura, Egija.

In: Journal of clinical periodontology, Vol. 44, 01.03.2017, p. S5-S11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanz, M, Beighton, D, Curtis, MA, Cury, JA, Dige, I, Dommisch, H, Ellwood, R, Giacaman, R, Herrera, D, Herzberg, MC, Könönen, E, Marsh, PD, Meyle, J, Mira, A, Molina, A, Mombelli, A, Quirynen, M, Reynolds, EC, Shapira, L & Zaura, E 2017, 'Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease', Journal of clinical periodontology, vol. 44, pp. S5-S11. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.12682
Sanz, Mariano ; Beighton, David ; Curtis, Michael A. ; Cury, Jaime A. ; Dige, Irene ; Dommisch, Henrik ; Ellwood, Roger ; Giacaman, Rodrigo ; Herrera, David ; Herzberg, Mark C. ; Könönen, Eija ; Marsh, Philip D. ; Meyle, Joerg ; Mira, Alex ; Molina, Ana ; Mombelli, Andrea ; Quirynen, Marc ; Reynolds, Eric C. ; Shapira, Lior ; Zaura, Egija. / Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease. In: Journal of clinical periodontology. 2017 ; Vol. 44. pp. S5-S11.
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AU - Beighton, David

AU - Curtis, Michael A.

AU - Cury, Jaime A.

AU - Dige, Irene

AU - Dommisch, Henrik

AU - Ellwood, Roger

AU - Giacaman, Rodrigo

AU - Herrera, David

AU - Herzberg, Mark C.

AU - Könönen, Eija

AU - Marsh, Philip D.

AU - Meyle, Joerg

AU - Mira, Alex

AU - Molina, Ana

AU - Mombelli, Andrea

AU - Quirynen, Marc

AU - Reynolds, Eric C.

AU - Shapira, Lior

AU - Zaura, Egija

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