Role of APOE ϵ4 Allele and Incident Stroke on Cognitive Decline and Mortality

Kumar B. Rajan, Neelum T. Aggarwal, Julie A. Schneider, Robert S. Wilson, Susan A. Everson-Rose, Denis A. Evans

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Abstract

Background: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 allele and stroke increase the risk of cognitive decline. However, the association of the APOE ϵ4 allele before and after stroke is not well understood. Methods: Using a prospective sample of 3444 (66% African Americans, 61% females, mean age=71.9 y) participants, we examined cognitive decline relative to stroke among those with and without the APOE ϵ4 allele. Results: In our sample, 505 (15%) had incident stroke. Among participants without stroke, the ϵ4 allele was associated with increased cognitive decline compared to noncarriers (0.080 vs. 0.036 units/year; P<0.0001). Among participants without the ϵ4 allele, cognitive decline increased significantly after stroke compared to before stroke (0.115 vs. 0.039 units/year; P<0.0001). Interestingly, cognitive decline before and after stroke was not significantly different among those with the ϵ4 allele (0.091 vs. 0.102 units/year; P=0.32). Poor cognitive function was associated with higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio=1.41, 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.58), but the APOE ϵ4 allele was not (P=0.66). The APOE ϵ4 allele, cognitive function, and incident stroke were associated with mortality. Conclusions: The association of stroke with cognitive decline appears to differ by the presence of the APOE ϵ4 allele, but no such interaction was observed for mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-323
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer disease and associated disorders
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Apolipoprotein E4
Stroke
Alleles
Mortality
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
African Americans

Keywords

  • APOE
  • cognitive decline
  • mortality
  • stroke

Cite this

Role of APOE ϵ4 Allele and Incident Stroke on Cognitive Decline and Mortality. / Rajan, Kumar B.; Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Schneider, Julie A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Evans, Denis A.

In: Alzheimer disease and associated disorders, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.01.2016, p. 318-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajan, Kumar B. ; Aggarwal, Neelum T. ; Schneider, Julie A. ; Wilson, Robert S. ; Everson-Rose, Susan A. ; Evans, Denis A. / Role of APOE ϵ4 Allele and Incident Stroke on Cognitive Decline and Mortality. In: Alzheimer disease and associated disorders. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 318-323.
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