Role of affective meaningfulness and self-concept in the verbal learning styles of White and Black children

Gerald J. August, Donald W. Felker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

White and Black 5th graders, representing 2 social class and 2 self-concept (Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale) levels, recalled nouns which they had prerated for likability in a multitrial free recall format. While self-concept failed to have any noticeable influence on the total sample, it interacted significantly with race. As predicted, the high self-concept White Ss recalled positively rated words more readily than negatively rated words, while their low self-concept peers showed no memory predilection. Although the low self-concept Black Ss also reflected no preference for their affective evaluations, the high self-concept Black Ss showed a greater propensity to recall their negatively rated words. Social class had a negligible effect on affective learning styles. (15 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-260
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1977

Keywords

  • affective meaningfulness of words &
  • self concept, verbal learning styles, White vs Black 5th graders

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