Risk of spotted-wing drosophila injury and associated increases in acetic acid in Minnesota winegrapes

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Abstract

Spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), is an invasive species to Minnesota that was first recorded in 2012. Since its arrival it has become a major pest of stone fruit and berry crops, including winegrapes. High fecundity and short generation times have allowed D. suzukii to flourish and spread throughout North America and Europe in a relatively short period of time. Laboratory and field trials were conducted between 2017 and 2019 to determine the risk of injury from D. suzukii in Minnesota winegrape varieties and to assess acetic acid (AA) levels in wine and juice samples from cold-hardy winegrape varieties in Minnesota. Results from risk of injury studies in 2017 and 2018 demonstrated a low risk of direct injury to intact grape berries. Winemakers, however, are concerned about the potential risk of D. suzukii infestations increasing AA-producing bacteria (e.g., Acetobacter spp.), known to expedite the development of sour rot in grapes. AA trials in 2017 and 2019 demonstrated significant increases in AA for select grape varieties as fly density increased. However, the 2018 AA trials with modified infestation protocols did not result in significant differences in AA. Our results are discussed within the context of improving integrated pest management programs for D. suzukii.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Enology and Viticulture
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Adam Toninato, Sarah Holle, and Izzy Bur (UMN Fruit & Vegetable lab) for assistance with data collection and treatment applications. A special thanks to John and Jenny Thull and Drew Horton (UMN Horticultural Research Center) for sharing their knowledge and expertise in winegrapes and assisting with data collection and trial processes. This research was supported by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, the University of Minnesota Rapid Agricultural Response Fund, and the UMN Extension Integrated Pest Management Program (NIFA Project no. 2017-70006-27278).

Funding Information:
1University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology, 1980 Folwell Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108-6125; and 2University of Minnesota, Grape Breeding & Enology Program, Department of Horticultural Science, 1970 Folwell Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108-6125. *Corresponding author (Ebbe0031@umn.edu; tel: (612) 624-3670; fax: (612) 625-5299) Acknowledgments: The authors thank Adam Toninato, Sarah Holle, and Izzy Bur (UMN Fruit & Vegetable lab) for assistance with data collection and treatment applications. A special thanks to John and Jenny Thull and Drew Horton (UMN Horticultural Research Center) for sharing their knowledge and expertise in winegrapes and assisting with data collection and trial processes. This research was supported by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, the University of Minnesota Rapid Agricultural Response Fund, and the UMN Extension Integrated Pest Management Program (NIFA Project no. 2017-70006-27278). Manuscript submitted Feb 2020, revised March 2020, July 2020, Sept 2020, accepted Sept 2020 Copyright © 2021 by the American Society for Enology and Viticulture. All rights reserved. By downloading and/or receiving this article, you agree to the Disclaimer of Warranties and Liability. The full statement of the Disclaimers is available at http://www.ajevonline.org/content/proprietary-rights-notice-ajev-online. If you do not agree to the Disclaimers, do not download and/or accept this article. doi: 10.5344/ajev.2020.20008

Keywords

  • Acetic acid bacteria
  • Drosophila suzukii
  • Integrated pest management
  • Risk of injury

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