Risk of hospital admission related to scooter trauma injuries: a national emergency room database study

Sergio M. Navarro, Victor R. Vakayil, Rafat H. Solaiman, Evan J. Keil, Matthew W. Cohen, Ellen J. Spartz, Christopher J. Tignanelli, James V. Harmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: We investigated key risk factors for hospital admission related to powered scooters, which are modes of transportation with increasing accessibility across the United States (US). Methods: We queried the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for injuries related to powered scooters, obtaining US population projections of injuries and hospital admissions. We determined mechanism of injury, characterized injury types, and performed multivariate regression analyses to determine factors associated with hospital admission. Results: One thousand one hundred ninety-one patients sustained electric-motorized scooter (e-scooter) injuries and 10.9% (131) required hospitalization from 2013 to 2018. This extrapolated to a US annual total of 862 (95% CI:745–979) scooter injuries requiring hospitalization, with estimated annual mortality of 6.7 patients per year (95% CI:4.8–8.5). The incidence of hospital admissions increased by an average of 13.1% each year of the study period. Fall (79 [60%]) and motor vehicle collision (33 [25%]) were the most common mechanism. Injury locations included head (44 [34%]), lower extremity (22 [17%]), and lower trunk (16 [12%]). On multivariable analysis, significant factors associated with admission included increased age (OR 1.02, 95% CI:1.01–1.02), torso injuries (OR 6.19, 2.93–13.10), concussion (25.45, 5.88–110.18), fractures (21.98, 7.13–67.66), musculoskeletal injury (6.65, 1.20–36.99), and collision with vehicle (3.343, 2.009–5.562). Scooter speed, seasonality, and gender were not associated with risk of hospitalization. Conclusion: Our findings show increased hospital admissions and mortality from powered scooter trauma, with fall and motor vehicle collisions as the most common mechanisms resulting in hospitalization. This calls for improved rider safety measures and regulation surrounding vehicular collision scenarios.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number150
JournalBMC Emergency Medicine
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
N/A. Sergio M. Navarro, Victor R. Vakayil, Rafat H. Solaiman, Evan J. Keil, Matthew W. Cohen, Ellen J. Spartz, Christopher J. Tignanelli, James V. Harmon, Jr. all declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Helmets, safety, regulations
  • Injury
  • Modeling

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Risk of hospital admission related to scooter trauma injuries: a national emergency room database study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this