Risk factors for nephropathy and cardiovascular disease in diabetic Northern Minnesota American Indians

C. A.I. Hirata-Dulas, S. J. Rith-Najarian, M. C. McIntyre, C. Ross, D. C. Dahl, W. F. Keane, B. L. Kasiske

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although complications of diabetes are common among Southwest American Indians, little is known about diabetes and associated risk factors for nephropathy and cardiovascular disease in other genetically distinct tribes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 665 diabetic patients at two Chippewa Indian reservations in northern Minnesota to evaluate the prevalence of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. In 79 patients, a more detailed study was carried out, including an assessment of renal function and urinary albumin excretion (UAE). The overall prevalences of proteinuria and hypertension were 47.9% and 62.6%, respectively. Proteinuria was observed more often in hypertensive than in non-hypertensive patients (55.2% vs 44.4%, p < 0.05), and in patients with diabetes for longer than 10 years (57% vs 40% for diabetes less than 10 years, p < 0.05). Although hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol ≤ 200 mg/dl) was observed in 54% of patients, there was no relationship between hypercholesterolemia and proteinuria. In the 79 patients studied in more detail, UAE was greater in hypertensive patients compared to non-hypertensive patients (606 ± 1560 mg/24 h vs 101 ± 157 mg/24 h, p < 0.05), and in patients with diabetes for 10 years or longer compared to patients in the first decade of disease (748 ± 1732 mg/24 h vs 96 ± 171 mg/24 h, p < 0.05). Hypercholesterolemia and elevated LDL-cholesterol (> 130 mg/dl) were observed in 56% and 49% of patients, respectively, but were not associated with increased UAE. In contrast, hypertriglyceridemia (> 250 mg/dl) was associated with an elevated UAE (932 ± 2150 mg/ 24 h vs 245 ± 735 mg/24 h, p < 0.05). Increased lipoprotein(a) was found in patients with overt albuminuria. In summary, the prevalence of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy and associated cardiovascular disease is high in Chippewa American Indians in northern Minnesota. Although detecting abnormal UAE may be useful in identifying high-risk patients who may benefit from early intervention, traditional risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia may not explain the risk associated with increased UAE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-98
Number of pages7
JournalClinical nephrology
Volume46
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 29 1996

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chippewa American Indians
  • Diabetic nephropathy
  • Microalbuminuria
  • Risk factors
  • Urinary albumin excretion

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    Hirata-Dulas, C. A. I., Rith-Najarian, S. J., McIntyre, M. C., Ross, C., Dahl, D. C., Keane, W. F., & Kasiske, B. L. (1996). Risk factors for nephropathy and cardiovascular disease in diabetic Northern Minnesota American Indians. Clinical nephrology, 46(2), 92-98.