Risk and Adversity, Parenting Quality, and Children's Social-Emotional Adjustment in Families Experiencing Homelessness

Madelyn H. Labella, Angela J. Narayan, Christopher M. Mccormick, Christopher D. Desjardins, Ann S. Masten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multimethod, multi-informant design was used to examine links among sociodemographic risk, family adversity, parenting quality, and child adjustment in families experiencing homelessness. Participants were 245 homeless parents (Mage = 31.0, 63.6% African American) and their 4- to 6-year-old children (48.6% male). Path analyses revealed unique associations by risk domain: Higher sociodemographic risk predicted more externalizing behavior and poorer teacher–child relationships, whereas higher family adversity predicted more internalizing behavior. Parenting quality was positively associated with peer acceptance and buffered effects of family adversity on internalizing symptoms, consistent with a protective effect. Parenting quality was associated with lower externalizing behavior only when sociodemographic risk was below the sample mean. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-244
Number of pages18
JournalChild development
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Social Adjustment
Homeless Persons
Parenting
homelessness
African Americans
parents
acceptance
Parents
Emotional Adjustment
Research

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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Risk and Adversity, Parenting Quality, and Children's Social-Emotional Adjustment in Families Experiencing Homelessness. / Labella, Madelyn H.; Narayan, Angela J.; Mccormick, Christopher M.; Desjardins, Christopher D.; Masten, Ann S.

In: Child development, Vol. 90, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 227-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Labella, Madelyn H. ; Narayan, Angela J. ; Mccormick, Christopher M. ; Desjardins, Christopher D. ; Masten, Ann S. / Risk and Adversity, Parenting Quality, and Children's Social-Emotional Adjustment in Families Experiencing Homelessness. In: Child development. 2019 ; Vol. 90, No. 1. pp. 227-244.
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