Retrospective analysis of the clinical utility of ambulatory electrocardiographic (Holter) recordings in syncopal dogs: 44 cases (1991-1995).

R. H. Miller, L. B. Lehmkuhl, J. D. Bonagura, M. J. Beall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the clinical utility of ambulatory (Holter) electrocardiographic monitoring in syncopal dogs and to compare the Holter recording with the clinic electrocardiogram (ECG) in these animals. Fifty Holter reports and 44 medical records from 44 dogs were evaluated. A syncopcal episode occurred during monitoring in 24% of the recordings. No obvious relationship was found between the frequency of syncope occurring before Holter recording and the likelihood of a dog having an episode during recording. Holter recordings were helpful in establishing a diagnosis 42% of the time, but no relationship was detected between the frequency of episodes occurring before Holter recording and the likelihood of a diagnostically useful Holter. An arrhythmia was ruled out as the cause of syncope in 12% of the recordings and was implicated as the cause of syncope in 30% of recordings. Of these, 20% were ventricular tachyarrhythmias and 10% were bradyarrhythmias including pacemaker failure. Ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings led to a therapeutic change in 38% of cases. A comparison of the Holter recordings and clinic ECGs documented the expected increased sensitivity for Holter detection of arrhythmias. The average clinic ECG heart rate consistently exceeded the average Holter heart rate with a mean difference between the average heart rates recorded by the two techniques of 31 bpm (range -8-87 bpm).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-122
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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