Rethinking ectomycorrhizal succession: Are root density and hyphal exploration types drivers of spatial and temporal zonation?

Kabir G. Peay, Peter G. Kennedy, Thomas D. Bruns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ectomycorrhizal exploration types have become an increasingly popular functional explanation for observed patterns of fungal community structure. In this study, we examined the relationship between exploration types of ectomycorrhizal fungi and root density. We did so by sampling across a root density gradient formed by the edge-interior transition on 'tree islands', patches of ectomycorrhizal forest in a non-ectomycorrhizal vegetation matrix. We found evidence that long-distance exploration types were more prevalent in areas of low root density while short-distance exploration types were more common in areas of high root density. Gradients in root density are common in ectomycorrhizal forests and change predictably at forest edges, within a soil profile, or over early succession. Based on these results, we propose a general model using the concept of exploration types that could explain some of the spatial or temporal patterns commonly observed in ectomycorrhizal assemblages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalFungal Ecology
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

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zonation
forest edge
fungal communities
edge effects
soil profiles
soil profile
community structure
fungus
vegetation
fungi
matrix
sampling

Keywords

  • Belowground
  • Dispersal
  • Functional ecology
  • Hyphae
  • Microbial
  • Mutualism
  • Mycorrhiza
  • Rhizomorph
  • Succession
  • Symbiosis

Cite this

Rethinking ectomycorrhizal succession : Are root density and hyphal exploration types drivers of spatial and temporal zonation? / Peay, Kabir G.; Kennedy, Peter G.; Bruns, Thomas D.

In: Fungal Ecology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.06.2011, p. 233-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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