Response of the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis to olfactory cues from target and non-target host-plant complexes

Kris A G Wyckhuys, George E Heimpel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The parasitoid Binodoxys communis (Gahan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a candidate for release against the Asian soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), in North America. Using a series of Y-tube olfactometer assays, we recorded responses of naïve and experienced B. communis females to odors from both target and non-target host plant complexes. The non-target host plant complexes included three aphid species native to North America [Aphis monardae Oestlund, Aphis oestlundi Gillette, and Aphis asclepiadis (Fitch)] and one species presumed to be exotic to North America (Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe), all on their respective host plants. We also investigated whether the parasitoid distinguishes between volatiles from soybean infested with A. glycines vs. those of uninfested plants. Volatiles from A. glycines-infested soybean plants and several non-target host plant complexes elicited a response in B. communis, which seemed to be reinforced through oviposition experience. Wasps with experience on a specific host plant complex increased their response to odors of this complex. Neither naïve nor experienced wasps, however, preferred odors from target vs. non-target host plant complexes in choice tests. Our data also indicate that B. communis is unable to distinguish between volatiles from infested vs. uninfested soybean plants. This study shows that B. communis females respond to a broad array of olfactory stimuli, exhibit low fidelity for any particular odor, and employ some behavioral plasticity in their response to volatile cues. We discuss implications of these results for establishment of B. communis and potential undesirable non-target effects associated with the release of this species in North America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-158
Number of pages10
JournalEntomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Binodoxys
Aphis glycines
olfactory cue
aphid
parasitoid
host plant
soybean
host plants
Aphis (Aphididae)
odor
odors
soybeans
wasp
Aphis nerii
olfactometers
Braconidae
Aphididae
Homoptera
oviposition
native species

Keywords

  • Braconidae
  • Classical biological control
  • Foraging behavior
  • Host-habitat location
  • Hymenoptera
  • Induced plant defense
  • Infochemicals
  • Learning
  • Non-target effects

Cite this

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title = "Response of the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis to olfactory cues from target and non-target host-plant complexes",
abstract = "The parasitoid Binodoxys communis (Gahan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a candidate for release against the Asian soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), in North America. Using a series of Y-tube olfactometer assays, we recorded responses of na{\"i}ve and experienced B. communis females to odors from both target and non-target host plant complexes. The non-target host plant complexes included three aphid species native to North America [Aphis monardae Oestlund, Aphis oestlundi Gillette, and Aphis asclepiadis (Fitch)] and one species presumed to be exotic to North America (Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe), all on their respective host plants. We also investigated whether the parasitoid distinguishes between volatiles from soybean infested with A. glycines vs. those of uninfested plants. Volatiles from A. glycines-infested soybean plants and several non-target host plant complexes elicited a response in B. communis, which seemed to be reinforced through oviposition experience. Wasps with experience on a specific host plant complex increased their response to odors of this complex. Neither na{\"i}ve nor experienced wasps, however, preferred odors from target vs. non-target host plant complexes in choice tests. Our data also indicate that B. communis is unable to distinguish between volatiles from infested vs. uninfested soybean plants. This study shows that B. communis females respond to a broad array of olfactory stimuli, exhibit low fidelity for any particular odor, and employ some behavioral plasticity in their response to volatile cues. We discuss implications of these results for establishment of B. communis and potential undesirable non-target effects associated with the release of this species in North America.",
keywords = "Braconidae, Classical biological control, Foraging behavior, Host-habitat location, Hymenoptera, Induced plant defense, Infochemicals, Learning, Non-target effects",
author = "Wyckhuys, {Kris A G} and Heimpel, {George E}",
year = "2007",
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doi = "10.1111/j.1570-7458.2007.00532.x",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Response of the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis to olfactory cues from target and non-target host-plant complexes

AU - Wyckhuys, Kris A G

AU - Heimpel, George E

PY - 2007/5/1

Y1 - 2007/5/1

N2 - The parasitoid Binodoxys communis (Gahan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a candidate for release against the Asian soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), in North America. Using a series of Y-tube olfactometer assays, we recorded responses of naïve and experienced B. communis females to odors from both target and non-target host plant complexes. The non-target host plant complexes included three aphid species native to North America [Aphis monardae Oestlund, Aphis oestlundi Gillette, and Aphis asclepiadis (Fitch)] and one species presumed to be exotic to North America (Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe), all on their respective host plants. We also investigated whether the parasitoid distinguishes between volatiles from soybean infested with A. glycines vs. those of uninfested plants. Volatiles from A. glycines-infested soybean plants and several non-target host plant complexes elicited a response in B. communis, which seemed to be reinforced through oviposition experience. Wasps with experience on a specific host plant complex increased their response to odors of this complex. Neither naïve nor experienced wasps, however, preferred odors from target vs. non-target host plant complexes in choice tests. Our data also indicate that B. communis is unable to distinguish between volatiles from infested vs. uninfested soybean plants. This study shows that B. communis females respond to a broad array of olfactory stimuli, exhibit low fidelity for any particular odor, and employ some behavioral plasticity in their response to volatile cues. We discuss implications of these results for establishment of B. communis and potential undesirable non-target effects associated with the release of this species in North America.

AB - The parasitoid Binodoxys communis (Gahan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a candidate for release against the Asian soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), in North America. Using a series of Y-tube olfactometer assays, we recorded responses of naïve and experienced B. communis females to odors from both target and non-target host plant complexes. The non-target host plant complexes included three aphid species native to North America [Aphis monardae Oestlund, Aphis oestlundi Gillette, and Aphis asclepiadis (Fitch)] and one species presumed to be exotic to North America (Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe), all on their respective host plants. We also investigated whether the parasitoid distinguishes between volatiles from soybean infested with A. glycines vs. those of uninfested plants. Volatiles from A. glycines-infested soybean plants and several non-target host plant complexes elicited a response in B. communis, which seemed to be reinforced through oviposition experience. Wasps with experience on a specific host plant complex increased their response to odors of this complex. Neither naïve nor experienced wasps, however, preferred odors from target vs. non-target host plant complexes in choice tests. Our data also indicate that B. communis is unable to distinguish between volatiles from infested vs. uninfested soybean plants. This study shows that B. communis females respond to a broad array of olfactory stimuli, exhibit low fidelity for any particular odor, and employ some behavioral plasticity in their response to volatile cues. We discuss implications of these results for establishment of B. communis and potential undesirable non-target effects associated with the release of this species in North America.

KW - Braconidae

KW - Classical biological control

KW - Foraging behavior

KW - Host-habitat location

KW - Hymenoptera

KW - Induced plant defense

KW - Infochemicals

KW - Learning

KW - Non-target effects

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U2 - 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2007.00532.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2007.00532.x

M3 - Article

VL - 123

SP - 149

EP - 158

JO - Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata

JF - Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata

SN - 0013-8703

IS - 2

ER -