Respite for dementia caregivers: The effects of adult day service use on caregiving hours and care demands

Joseph E. Gaugler, Shannon E. Jarrott, Steven H. Zarit, Mary Ann Parris Stephens, Aloen Townsend, Rick Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether adult day service use was related to decreases in primary caregiving hours (i.e., the time caregivers spent on activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living and behavior problems for care recipients) and care recipient function for these domains. Three-month longitudinal data from the Adult Day Care Collaborative Study (N = 400) were used. Adult day service users reported greater decreases in hours spent on behavior problems when compared to nonusers, even after controlling for baseline differences between the two groups. In addition, adult day service users reported decreased frequency of behavior problems in their relatives who attended adult day programs. The findings suggest that adult day services, if used over time, are effective in restructuring caregiving time and may offer potential benefits not only to family caregivers but to community-residing older adults who have dementia as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-58
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Keywords

  • Adult day care
  • Adult day programs
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Community-based care
  • Families

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