Resin use by stingless bees: A review

Maggie Shanahan, Marla Spivak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stingless bees (Meliponini) are highly social bees that are native to tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems. Resin use is vital to many aspects of stingless bee colony function. Stingless bees use resin to build essential nest structures, repel predators, and kill would-be invaders. Furthermore, resin-derived compounds have been found to enrich the cuticular chemical profiles of many stingless bee species, and resin may play an important role in shaping the microbial communities associated with stingless bees and their nests. Despite its importance for colony function, previous reviews of resin use by stingless bees are lacking. This topic grows increasingly urgent as changes in beekeeping and land use practices occur, potentially diminishing stingless bees’ ability to incorporate resin into the nest environment. In this article, we review existing literature on resin use by stingless bees and discuss potential areas of future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number719
JournalInsects
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. CON-75851, project 00074041 to M. Shanahan. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Funding was also provided by USDA-NIFA2018-67013-27532 to M. Spivak, and by the University of Minnesota (UMN) Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change, the UMN Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment & the Life Sciences, and the UMN Thesis Research Travel Grant to M. Shanahan.

Funding Information:
This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. CON-75851, project 00074041 to M. Shanahan. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Funding was also provided by USDA-NIFA 2018-67013-27532 to M. Spivak, and by the University of Minnesota (UMN) Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change, the UMN Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment & the Life Sciences, and the UMN Thesis Research Travel Grant to M. Shanahan.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Colony health
  • Meliponini
  • Microbiome
  • Propolis
  • Resin
  • Stingless bees

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