Resilience and mental health in individuals with spinal cord injury during the COVID-19 pandemic

Brian M Mikolajczyk, Christina Draganich, Angela Philippus, Richard Goldstein, Andrews Erin Andrews, Carrie Pilarski, Robert Wudlick, Leslie R. Morse, Kimberley R. Monden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Objectives: To understand how resilience, access to personal care attendants (PCAs) and medical supplies, and concerns about medical rationing, finances, and social isolation are related to overall and mental health in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Setting: Community dwelling adults (N = 187) with SCI. Methods: Data were collected online between May 1, 2020 and August 31, 2020. Outcomes were overall and mental health, depression and anxiety symptoms, and quality of life (QoL). Predictors were resilience, access to PCAs and medical supplies, and concerns about medical rationing, finances, and social isolation. Results: Incomplete injury, concern about medical rationing, medical supply disruption, and social isolation predicted a greater perceived impact of the pandemic on overall heath. Younger age, decreased resilience, and concern about medical rationing and social isolation predicted greater perceived impact of the pandemic on mental health. Decreased resilience and concern about medical rationing and finances predicted increased anxiety symptoms. Incomplete injury, believing that medical rationing was occurring, decreased resilience, and concern about finances and social isolation predicted increased depressive symptoms. Decreased resilience and concern about finances, medical rationing, and social isolation predicted lower QoL. Conclusions: The negative effects of the pandemic on the overall and mental health of individuals with SCI may be ameliorated by resilience. In future crises, it may be beneficial to screen individuals for resilience so that those with decreased resilience are offered the appropriate resources to enhance resilience and improve overall wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1261-1267
Number of pages7
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume59
Issue number12
Early online dateSep 23 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to International Spinal Cord Society.

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