Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption of soy consumers versus nonconsumers in natural foods or mainstream grocery stores

Tamara Schyver, Chery Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the attitudes and beliefs of soy foods consumers (SCs) versus nonconsumers (NCs). Design: Seven focus groups were conducted. Setting: Mainstream or natural foods grocery stores. Participants: Fifty-three participants, ages 18 to 91 years. Variables Measured: Focus groups included discussions on lifestyle practices, beliefs about soy, conversion to soy consumption, and suggestions on how to increase soy consumption. Analysis: Common themes were identified, coded, and compared using NVivo computer software. Results: Barriers to soy consumption included soy's image, a lack of familiarity with how to prepare soy foods, and a perception that soy foods were an inadequate flavor substitute for animal-based products. SCs' conversion to regular consumption was initiated by food intolerances, an increased interest in health, or an adoption of a vegetarian or natural foods lifestyle and was sustained because they enjoyed the flavor. Many participants did not know why soy was considered healthful, whereas others identified it as "heart healthy," a source of protein, and good for women's health. Some SCs had become concerned regarding the controversy surrounding breast cancer and soy consumption. Conclusions and Implications: Improving soy's image and educating consumers on its preparation could increase soy consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-299
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Beliefs
  • Mainstream shoppers
  • Natural foods shoppers
  • Soy consumption
  • Taste

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