Replicate effects and test–retest reliability of quantitative sensory threshold testing in dogs with and without chronic pain

David Knazovicky, Erika S. Helgeson, Beth Case, Andrea Thomson, Margaret E. Gruen, William Maixner, B. Duncan X. Lascelles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate replicate effects and test–retest reliability of mechanical and thermal quantitative sensory testing (QST) in normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain. Study design A prospective clinical study. Animals A total of 54 client owned dogs (OA, n = 31; controls, n = 23). Methods Mechanical [electronic von Frey (EVF) and blunt pressure] and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds were obtained in dogs with OA-associated pain and control dogs at two visits, 7 days apart, to assess test–retest reliability. Thresholds were measured at the OA-affected joint (hip or stifle), over the tibial muscle and over the midpoint of the metatarsals. Five replicates were obtained for each modality at each site bilaterally. Results Overall, there was no significant effect of replicates on QST response. EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit in OA dogs at the affected and metatarsal sites (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Similarly for control dogs, EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit at the metatarsal site (p = 0.001). Significantly higher hot thermal latencies were seen in OA dogs at the affected and tibial testing sites (p = 0.014 and p = 0.012, respectively), and in control dogs at the tibial site (p = 0.004). Conclusions In QST, a replicate does not show a strong effect. However, QST results show variability over time, particularly for EVF and hot thermal stimuli. Clinical relevance If QST is to be used clinically to evaluate a sensitized state, the variability over time needs to be accounted for in the study design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-624
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary anaesthesia and analgesia
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

Fingerprint

Sensory Thresholds
Chronic Pain
pain
osteoarthritis
Dogs
Osteoarthritis
dogs
Metatarsal Bones
electronics
testing
Hot Temperature
heat
experimental design
Stifle
Pain
Hip Joint
hips
joints (animal)
clinical trials
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • central sensitization
  • chronic pain
  • dogs
  • quantitative sensory testing
  • replicate effect

Cite this

Replicate effects and test–retest reliability of quantitative sensory threshold testing in dogs with and without chronic pain. / Knazovicky, David; Helgeson, Erika S.; Case, Beth; Thomson, Andrea; Gruen, Margaret E.; Maixner, William; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

In: Veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia, Vol. 44, No. 3, 05.2017, p. 615-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knazovicky, David ; Helgeson, Erika S. ; Case, Beth ; Thomson, Andrea ; Gruen, Margaret E. ; Maixner, William ; Lascelles, B. Duncan X. / Replicate effects and test–retest reliability of quantitative sensory threshold testing in dogs with and without chronic pain. In: Veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia. 2017 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 615-624.
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abstract = "Objective To evaluate replicate effects and test–retest reliability of mechanical and thermal quantitative sensory testing (QST) in normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain. Study design A prospective clinical study. Animals A total of 54 client owned dogs (OA, n = 31; controls, n = 23). Methods Mechanical [electronic von Frey (EVF) and blunt pressure] and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds were obtained in dogs with OA-associated pain and control dogs at two visits, 7 days apart, to assess test–retest reliability. Thresholds were measured at the OA-affected joint (hip or stifle), over the tibial muscle and over the midpoint of the metatarsals. Five replicates were obtained for each modality at each site bilaterally. Results Overall, there was no significant effect of replicates on QST response. EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit in OA dogs at the affected and metatarsal sites (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Similarly for control dogs, EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit at the metatarsal site (p = 0.001). Significantly higher hot thermal latencies were seen in OA dogs at the affected and tibial testing sites (p = 0.014 and p = 0.012, respectively), and in control dogs at the tibial site (p = 0.004). Conclusions In QST, a replicate does not show a strong effect. However, QST results show variability over time, particularly for EVF and hot thermal stimuli. Clinical relevance If QST is to be used clinically to evaluate a sensitized state, the variability over time needs to be accounted for in the study design.",
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N2 - Objective To evaluate replicate effects and test–retest reliability of mechanical and thermal quantitative sensory testing (QST) in normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain. Study design A prospective clinical study. Animals A total of 54 client owned dogs (OA, n = 31; controls, n = 23). Methods Mechanical [electronic von Frey (EVF) and blunt pressure] and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds were obtained in dogs with OA-associated pain and control dogs at two visits, 7 days apart, to assess test–retest reliability. Thresholds were measured at the OA-affected joint (hip or stifle), over the tibial muscle and over the midpoint of the metatarsals. Five replicates were obtained for each modality at each site bilaterally. Results Overall, there was no significant effect of replicates on QST response. EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit in OA dogs at the affected and metatarsal sites (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Similarly for control dogs, EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit at the metatarsal site (p = 0.001). Significantly higher hot thermal latencies were seen in OA dogs at the affected and tibial testing sites (p = 0.014 and p = 0.012, respectively), and in control dogs at the tibial site (p = 0.004). Conclusions In QST, a replicate does not show a strong effect. However, QST results show variability over time, particularly for EVF and hot thermal stimuli. Clinical relevance If QST is to be used clinically to evaluate a sensitized state, the variability over time needs to be accounted for in the study design.

AB - Objective To evaluate replicate effects and test–retest reliability of mechanical and thermal quantitative sensory testing (QST) in normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain. Study design A prospective clinical study. Animals A total of 54 client owned dogs (OA, n = 31; controls, n = 23). Methods Mechanical [electronic von Frey (EVF) and blunt pressure] and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds were obtained in dogs with OA-associated pain and control dogs at two visits, 7 days apart, to assess test–retest reliability. Thresholds were measured at the OA-affected joint (hip or stifle), over the tibial muscle and over the midpoint of the metatarsals. Five replicates were obtained for each modality at each site bilaterally. Results Overall, there was no significant effect of replicates on QST response. EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit in OA dogs at the affected and metatarsal sites (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Similarly for control dogs, EVF thresholds were significantly lower at the second visit at the metatarsal site (p = 0.001). Significantly higher hot thermal latencies were seen in OA dogs at the affected and tibial testing sites (p = 0.014 and p = 0.012, respectively), and in control dogs at the tibial site (p = 0.004). Conclusions In QST, a replicate does not show a strong effect. However, QST results show variability over time, particularly for EVF and hot thermal stimuli. Clinical relevance If QST is to be used clinically to evaluate a sensitized state, the variability over time needs to be accounted for in the study design.

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