Renewable ammonia for sustainable energy and agriculture: vision and systems engineering opportunities

Matthew J. Palys, Hanchu Wang, Qi Zhang, Prodromos Daoutidis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Synthetic ammonia is essential for agriculture, but its production at present is unsustainable. Ammonia synthesized with hydrogen from renewable-powered electrolysis and nitrogen separated from air has the potential to alleviate these sustainability concerns while also having promise as a low-cost storage medium for intermittent renewable energy. This paper reviews recent research and development on the topic of renewable ammonia production and utilization as fertilizer and as energy storage. We describe our vision for synergistically combining these renewable ammonia applications to improve sustainability. Furthermore, we outline opportunities for systems engineering to play a crucial role in advancing the adoption of renewable ammonia in a manner which is sustainable, economically competitive, and reliable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100667
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Engineering
Volume31
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF-CBET); in part by the Digital Technology Center of the University of Minnesota through a Digital Technology Initiative Seed Grant; and in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000804. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. The icons in Figure 1 are from flaticon.com. The specific icons are attributed to their authors below:

Funding Information:
This work was funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF-CBET) ; in part by the Digital Technology Center of the University of Minnesota through a Digital Technology Initiative Seed Grant; and in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000804. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

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