Renal transplantation for patients 60 years of age or older: A single- institution experience

Enrico Benedetti, Arthur J. Matas, Nadey Hakim, Carlos Fasola, Kristen Gillingham, Lois McHugh, John S. Najarian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The authors reviewed renal transplant outcomes in recipients 60 years of age or older. Background: Before cyclosporine, patients older than 45 years of age were considered to be at high risk for transplantation. With cyclosporine, the age limits for transplantation have expanded. Methods: The authors compared patient and graft survival, hospital stay, the incidence of rejection and rehospitalization, and the cause of graft loss for primary kidney recipients 60 years of age or older versus those 18 to 59 years of age. For those patients ≥60 years transplanted since 1985, the authors analyzed pretransplant extrarenal disease and its impact on post-transplant outcome. In addition, all surviving recipients ≥60 years completed a medical outcome survey (SF-36). Results: Patient and graft survival for those ≥60 years of age versus those 18 to 59 years of age were similar 3 years after transplant. Subsequently, mortality increased for the older recipients. Death-censored graft survival was identical in the two groups. There were no differences in the cause of graft loss. Those 60 years of age or older had a longer initial hospitalization, but had fewer rejection episodes and fewer rehospitalizations. Quality of life for recipients 60 years of age or older was similar to the age-matched U.S. population. Conclusion: Renal transplantation is successful for recipients 60 years of age or older. Most of them had extrarenal disease at the time of transplantation; however, extrarenal disease was not an important predictor of outcome and should not be used as an exclusion criterion. Post-transplant quality of life is excellent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-460
Number of pages16
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume220
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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