Renal artery Doppler compared with the cerebral placental ratio to identify fetuses at risk for adverse neonatal outcome

Stephen Contag, Pooja Patel, Stephanie Payton, Sarah Crimmins, Katherine R. Goetzinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Current clinical practice incorporates an umbilical artery resistance index or a ratio of the middle cerebral artery (MCA PI) to the umbilical artery pulsatility index (UA PI) known as the cerebral placental ratio (CPR) to assess wellbeing in the small for gestational age fetus. Previous reports using the renal artery Doppler indices have not been consistent in regards to their design and clinical use. Our objective is to develop reference values for renal artery Doppler indices and validate their use compared with the UA PI or CPR to identify fetuses that will develop a composite neonatal outcome. Methods: We performed 9700 ultrasounds among 2852 women at 20–40 weeks of gestation at the University of Maryland between 1 June 2016 and 1 December 2016. Nomograms were first developed using one randomly selected scan from each of a subgroup of 860 women without any comorbidities. The nomograms were validated among a cohort of 550 women who subsequently delivered at the University of Maryland Medical Center. We compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) between the CPR and UA PI, and the renal artery Doppler parameters (renal artery pulsatility index (RA PI), systolic diastolic ratio (RA SDR), and peak systolic velocity (RA PSV)). The primary outcome was the development any one of the composite neonatal outcome components (death, intensive care unit admission, ventilator for more than 6 h, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy or necrotizing enterocolitis) or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for any indication. Results: The renal artery Doppler indices did not improve identification of fetuses that would subsequently develop one of the components of the composite neonatal outcome (AUROC for CPR 0.54, 95% CI (0.49–0.59), versus the UA PI: 0.59 (0.54–0.64) p =.07, the RA PI: 0.51 (0.48–0.55) p =.41, RA SDR 0.54 (0.49–0.58) p =.99, or RA PSV 0.51 (0.47–0.55) p =.37). There was no difference when comparing AUROC to detect NICU admission (AUROC for CPR 0.53, 95% CI (0.49–0.58), versus the UA PI: 0.57 (0.52–0.62) p =.14, the RA PI: 0.50 (0.47–0.54) p =.44, RA SDR: 0.54 (0.50–0.59) p =.62 or RAPSV: 0.51 (0.47–0.55) p =.54). Conclusion: The renal artery indices do not improve detection of fetuses at risk for adverse neonatal outcomes compared with the CPR or the UA PI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)532-540
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Cerebral placental ratio
  • Doppler
  • fetal growth restriction
  • pulsatility index
  • renal artery

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