Remote acculturation of early adolescents in jamaica towards european american culture: A replication and extension

Gail Ferguson, Marc H. Bornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Remote acculturation is a modern form of non-immigrant acculturation identified among early adolescents in Jamaica as "Americanization". This study aimed to replicate the original remote acculturation findings in a new cohort of early adolescents in Jamaica (n= 222; M= 12.08 years) and to extend our understanding of remote acculturation by investigating potential vehicles of indirect and intermittent intercultural contact. Cluster analyses replicated prior findings: relative to Traditional Jamaican adolescents (62%), Americanized Jamaican adolescents (38%) reported stronger European American cultural orientation, lower Jamaican orientation, lower family obligations, and greater conflict with parents. More U.S. media (girls) and less local media and local sports (all) were the primary vehicles of intercultural contact predicting higher odds of Americanization. U.S. food, U.S. tourism, and transnational communication were also linked to U.S. orientation. Findings have implications for acculturation research and for practice and policy targeting Caribbean youth and families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-35
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
Volume45
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Caribbean/west indian
  • Fast food
  • Globalization
  • Immigration
  • Media
  • Tridimensional acculturation

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