Religiosity, internalized homonegativity and outness in Christian men who have sex with men

J. Michael Wilkerson, Derek J. Smolenski, Sonya S Brady, B. R. Simon Rosser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When exposed to their congregations' negative views of homosexuality, Christian men who have sex with men frequently struggle to reconcile their religious and sexual identities, possibly contributing to negative emotional states and behaviors associated with HIV/STI infection. To examine the influence of religiousity on internalized homonegativity and outness among Christian men who have sex with men, we used survey data from 1165 men who answered questions about their religious beliefs and sexual behavior. We stratified participants based on religious affiliation groupings: Catholic, Mainline Protestant and Evangelical Protestant. After using confirmatory factor analysis to verify that the selected measures of religiosity were equivalent between groups, we used structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between religiosity, internalized homonegativity and outness. Among Catholics and Mainline Protestants, religiosity was not associated with internalized homonegativy or outness. However, among Evangelical Protestants - a group more likely to ascribe to religious fundamentalism - increased religiosity was associated with increased internalized homonegativity, which contributed to decreased outness. Our findings suggest that mental health providers and sexuality educators should be more concerned about the influence of religiosity on internalized homonegativity and outness when clients have a history of affiliation with Evangelical Protestant faiths more so than Catholic or Mainline Protestant faiths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-132
Number of pages11
JournalSexual and Relationship Therapy
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Homosexuality
Sexuality
Religion
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Sexual Behavior
Statistical Factor Analysis
HIV Infections
Mental Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • homophobia
  • male homosexuality
  • psychosexual behavior
  • religion
  • sexual orientation

Cite this

Religiosity, internalized homonegativity and outness in Christian men who have sex with men. / Wilkerson, J. Michael; Smolenski, Derek J.; Brady, Sonya S; Rosser, B. R. Simon.

In: Sexual and Relationship Therapy, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 122-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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