Relevance of the glycemic index and glycemic load for body weight, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease

Sonia Vega-López, Bernard J. Venn, Joanne L Slavin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite initial enthusiasm, the relationship between glycemic index (GI) and glycemic response (GR) and disease prevention remains unclear. This review examines evidence from randomized, controlled trials and observational studies in humans for short-term (e.g., satiety) and long-term (e.g., weight, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes) health effects associated with different types of GI diets. A systematic PubMed search was conducted of studies published between 2006 and 2018 with key words glycemic index, glycemic load, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, body weight, satiety, and obesity. Criteria for inclusion for observational studies and randomized intervention studies were set. The search yielded 445 articles, of which 73 met inclusion criteria. Results suggest an equivocal relationship between GI/GR and disease outcome. The strongest intervention studies typically find little relationship among GI/GR and physiological measures of disease risk. Even for observational studies, the relationship between GI/GR and disease outcomes is limited. Thus, it is unlikely that the GI of a food or diet is linked to disease risk or health outcomes. Other measures of dietary quality, such as fiber or whole grains may be more likely to predict health outcomes. Interest in food patterns as predictors of health benefits may be more fruitful for research to inform dietary guidance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1361
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Glycemic Index
glycemic index
cardiovascular diseases
diabetes
Cardiovascular Diseases
Body Weight
body weight
observational studies
Observational Studies
satiety
Health
Diet
Food
dietary recommendations
whole grain foods
nutritional adequacy
disease prevention
Insurance Benefits
Glycemic Load
noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Carbohydrates
  • Chronic disease risk
  • Glycemic index
  • Glycemic load
  • Glycemic response
  • Satiety
  • Type 2 diabetes

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Relevance of the glycemic index and glycemic load for body weight, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. / Vega-López, Sonia; Venn, Bernard J.; Slavin, Joanne L.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 10, 1361, 01.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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