Relative longevity of adult Nezara viridula in field cages of cotton, peanut, and soybean

D. M. Olson, J. R. Ruberson, D. A. Andow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Producers in the southeastern USA face significant crop losses from the stink bugs Nezara viridula (L.), Euschistus servus (Say), and Chinavia hilaris (Say) (all Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Cotton, peanut, and soybean are major agronomic crops and host plants of stink bugs in the region. We conducted a field plot study to measure the relative longevity of adult, unmated N. viridula males and females caged on peanut, cotton, and soybean to test three hypotheses: (1) differences in mortality are associated with differences in host plant food suitability, (2) mortality rates increase with age, and (3) males have higher mortality than females. Using survival analysis, we found that the sex of the individual did not affect survival rates on any of the three host plants. Survival was significantly higher in cotton and soybean than in peanut. Mortality rates increased with age in peanut, but not in soybean or cotton. The frequency of canopy temperatures above 35 °C was higher in peanut than in soybean. Peanut appears to be a less than ideal habitat in terms of canopy temperature and/or food quality for N. viridula adults. Both, cotton and soybean were equally suitable food resources for N. viridula adults prior to maturation of the plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-36
Number of pages7
JournalEntomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Volume159
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • Hemiptera
  • Mortality rate
  • Pentatomidae
  • Resource suitability
  • Southern green stink bug
  • Survival

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Relative longevity of adult Nezara viridula in field cages of cotton, peanut, and soybean'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this