Relationships between Social-Emotional Intelligence and Sexual Risk Behaviors in Adolescent Girls

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social-emotional intelligence (SEI) has been linked with a number of health behaviors in adolescent populations. However, little is known about the influence of SEI on sexual behavior. This study examined associations between three indicators of SEI (intrapersonal skills, interpersonal skills, stress management skills) and adolescent girls sexual risk behaviors. Data come from a cross-sectional sample of sexually active adolescent girls (ages 13 to 17 years) at high risk for pregnancy (N = 253), recruited from health care clinics in a Midwest metropolitan area during 2007 and 2008. Results of multivariable regression models controlling for participants age and race/ethnicity indicated that each aspect of SEI was related to distinct sexual risk behaviors. Specifically, girls with greater intrapersonal skills had significantly fewer male sex partners in the past six months (b =-0.16). Participants with greater interpersonal skills reported earlier communication with their sexual partner about sexual risk (b = 0.14), and those with a better ability to manage stress reported more consistent condom use (b = 0.31). Study findings suggest that SEI may provide a protective buffer against sexual risk behaviors. Building adolescent girls social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their risk for early pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)835-840
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume52
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2015

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Emotional Intelligence
emotional intelligence
Risk-Taking
risk behavior
Sexual Behavior
adolescent
pregnancy
High-Risk Pregnancy
stress management
Aptitude
Sexual Partners
Health Behavior
Condoms
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
health behavior
agglomeration area
Buffers
ethnicity
Communication
Sexual

Cite this

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title = "Relationships between Social-Emotional Intelligence and Sexual Risk Behaviors in Adolescent Girls",
abstract = "Social-emotional intelligence (SEI) has been linked with a number of health behaviors in adolescent populations. However, little is known about the influence of SEI on sexual behavior. This study examined associations between three indicators of SEI (intrapersonal skills, interpersonal skills, stress management skills) and adolescent girls sexual risk behaviors. Data come from a cross-sectional sample of sexually active adolescent girls (ages 13 to 17 years) at high risk for pregnancy (N = 253), recruited from health care clinics in a Midwest metropolitan area during 2007 and 2008. Results of multivariable regression models controlling for participants age and race/ethnicity indicated that each aspect of SEI was related to distinct sexual risk behaviors. Specifically, girls with greater intrapersonal skills had significantly fewer male sex partners in the past six months (b =-0.16). Participants with greater interpersonal skills reported earlier communication with their sexual partner about sexual risk (b = 0.14), and those with a better ability to manage stress reported more consistent condom use (b = 0.31). Study findings suggest that SEI may provide a protective buffer against sexual risk behaviors. Building adolescent girls social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their risk for early pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections",
author = "Elizabeth Lando-King and Annie-Laurie McRee and Gower, {Amy L} and Shlafer, {Rebecca J} and McMorris, {Barbara J} and Sandra Pettingell and Sieving, {Renee E}",
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AU - Pettingell, Sandra

AU - Sieving, Renee E

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