Relationships between indicators of cardiovascular disease and intensity of oil and natural gas activity in Northeastern Colorado

Lisa M. McKenzie, James Crooks, Jennifer L. Peel, Benjamin D. Blair, Stephen Brindley, William B. Allshouse, Stephanie Malin, John L. Adgate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Oil and natural gas (O&G) extraction emits pollutants that are associated with cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Objective: We evaluated associations between intensity of O&G activity and cardiovascular disease indicators. Methods: Between October 2015 and May 2016, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 97 adults living in Northeastern Colorado. For each participant, we collected 1–3 measurements of augmentation index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)− 1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We modelled the intensity of O&G activity by weighting O&G well counts within 16 km of a participant's home by intensity and distance. We used linear models accounting for repeated measures within person to evaluate associations. Results: Adjusted mean augmentation index differed by 6.0% (95% CI: 0.6, 11.4%) and 5.1% (95%CI: −0.1, 10.4%) between high and medium, respectively, and low exposure tertiles. The greatest mean IL-1β, and α-TNF plasma concentrations were observed for participants in the highest exposure tertile. IL-6 and IL-8 results were consistent with a null result. For participants not taking prescription medications, the adjusted mean SBP differed by 6 and 1 mm Hg (95% CIs: 0.1, 13 mm Hg and −6, 8 mm Hg) between the high and medium, respectively, and low exposure tertiles. DBP results were similar. For participants taking prescription medications, SBP and DBP results were consistent with a null result. Conclusions: Despite limitations, our results support associations between O&G activity and augmentation index, SBP, DBP, IL-1β, and TNF-α. Our study was not able to elucidate possible mechanisms or environmental stressors, such as air pollution and noise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-64
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume170
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by support from the National Institutes for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), United States (R21-ES025140-01). It was also supported by data and resources from the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), United States under Grant No. CBET-1240584. Any opinions, findings conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NIEHS, the National Institutes of Health, or the NSF.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by support from the National Institutes for Environmental Health Sciences ( NIEHS ), United States ( R21-ES025140-01 ). It was also supported by data and resources from the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), United States under Grant No. CBET-1240584 . Any opinions, findings conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NIEHS, the National Institutes of Health, or the NSF.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier Inc.

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