Relationships between Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Resting State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls: A Preliminary Study

Matthew J. Hoptman, Umit Tural, Kelvin O. Lim, Daniel C. Javitt, Lauren E. Oberlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Schizophrenia is widely seen as a disorder of dysconnectivity. Neuroimaging studies have examined both structural and functional connectivity in the disorder, but these modalities have rarely been integrated directly. We scanned 29 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy control subjects, and we acquired resting state fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging. We used the Functional and Tractographic Connectivity Analysis Toolbox (FATCAT) to estimate functional and structural connectivity of the default mode network. Correlations between modalities were investigated, and multimodal connectivity scores (MCS) were created using principal component analysis. Of the 28 possible region pairs, 9 showed consistent (>80%) tracts across participants. Correlations between modalities were found among those with schizophrenia for the prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and lateral temporal lobes, with frontal and parietal regions, consistent with frontotemporoparietal network involvement in the disorder. In patients, MCS correlated with several aspects of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, with higher multimodal connectivity associated with outward-directed (externalizing) behavior and lower multimodal connectivity related to psychosis per se. In this preliminary sample, we found FATCAT to be a useful toolbox to directly integrate and examine connectivity between imaging modalities. A consideration of conjoint structural and functional connectivity can provide important information about the network mechanisms of schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number156
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This research was funded by National Institutes of Health grants to Matthew J. Hoptman (R21MH084031) and Daniel C. Javitt (R01MH049334 and P50MH086385). Scanning was supported by a large instrumentation grant (S10RR022972) to Craig A. Branch, PhD.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • DTI
  • FATCAT
  • Resting state
  • Schizophrenia
  • Tractography

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Relationships between Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Resting State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls: A Preliminary Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this