Relationships between aggressive behavior in cognitively impaired nursing home residents and use of restraints, psychoactive drugs, and secured units

Muriel B. Ryden, Karen S. Feldt, Heeyoung Lee Oh, Karen Brand, Mary Warne, Eileen Weber, Judy Nelson, Cynthia Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined relationships between aggressive behavior in cognitively impaired nursing home residents and physical restraints, psychoactive drugs, and placement on a secured unit. Data were obtained from 116 residents who were consistently aggressive as measured by the Ryden Aggression Scale 2. Subjects averaged 9.5 aggressive behaviors per day. Forty-seven percent of subjects were restrained, and 62% were regularly receiving psychoactive drugs, use of restraints, antipsychotics, and placement on a secured unit were all significantly related to increased physical aggression scores. Four variables accounted for 23% of the variance in physical aggression scores: location on a secured unit, not receiving an antidepressant, being restrained, and number of psychotropic and/or anxiolytic medications administered. Significantly lower physical aggression scores were noted for subjects receiving antidepressants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-178
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of psychiatric nursing
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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