Relationship between changes in the calcium dependent regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase during viral transformation

David C. LaPorte, Susan Gidwitz, Michael J. Weber, Daniel R. Storm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

The levels of the calcium dependent regulatory protein in transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts are higher both in soluble fractions and membrane fractions compared to untransformed cells. The kinetics for changes in the calcium dependent regulatory protein, hexose transport, and adenylate cyclase were compared using a temperature sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus. Decreases in adenylate cyclase activity and increased hexose transport accompanying transformation occurred with half-lives of approximately 7 to 8 hours. Increases in the calcium dependent regulatory protein occurred much slower with a half-life of seventeen hours. It is concluded that the increase in calcium dependent regulatory protein levels is a late event during viral transformation and that the decline in adenylate cyclase activity cannot be due to changes in the amount of calcium dependent regulatory protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1169-1177
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 1979

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
ACKNOWLEDGMENT our appreciation to Diane G. Toscano for her skillful This work was supported by a grant from the Illinois Heart Association, National Science Foundation Grant PCM 73-001245, and Research Career Development Award A100120 to D.R.S. and National Cancer Grant CA12467 and Research Career Development Award CA00092 to M.J.W. S.G. is a recipient Public Health Service Predoctoral Fellowship 5T 32 GM07110-03.

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