Relation of C-reactive protein and other cardiovascular risk factors to penile vascular disease in men with erectile dysfunction

A. J. Bank, K. L. Billups, D. R. Kaiser, Aaron S Kelly, R. A. Wetterling, Michael Y Tsai, N. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Erectile dysfunction (ED) may be an early sign or symptom of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the relation of traditional and emerging risk factors for CVD to the severity of penile vascular disease in men with ED and without clinical coronary artery disease (CAD). In total, 137 men with ED were evaluated for penile vascular disease severity by penile Doppler ultrasound. These men were divided into the following groups based on ultrasound results: normal, cavernous venous occlusive disease, mild arterial insufficiency, and severe arterial insufficiency. Traditional (fasting lipid panel, fasting glucose, age, BMI, smoking, Framingham coronary artery disease risk score) and emerging (C-reactive protein, Lp(a), homocysteine) risk factors for CVD were correlated to severity of penile vascular disease in men with ED and without clinical CAD. Using univariate analysis, penile Doppler groups showed significant positive correlation to CRP (r=0.21; P <0.05) and age (r=0.30; P <0.01). For CRP, this correlation remained significant even when adjusted for age (P <0.05). Men displaying evidence of penile arterial disease (mild and severe arterial insufficiency) were characterized by elevated CRP levels (0.17mg/dl) compared to men with no evidence of arterial abnormalities in the penis (0.04mg/dl). CRP levels correlate significantly with increasing severity of penile vascular disease as measured by penile Doppler.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-236
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Impotence Research
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003

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Penile Diseases
Erectile Dysfunction
Vascular Diseases
C-Reactive Protein
Coronary Artery Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fasting
Doppler Ultrasonography
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Penis
Homocysteine
Signs and Symptoms
Smoking
Lipids
Glucose

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Penile Doppler

Cite this

Relation of C-reactive protein and other cardiovascular risk factors to penile vascular disease in men with erectile dysfunction. / Bank, A. J.; Billups, K. L.; Kaiser, D. R.; Kelly, Aaron S; Wetterling, R. A.; Tsai, Michael Y; Hanson, N.

In: International Journal of Impotence Research, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.08.2003, p. 231-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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