Region-specific aging of the human brain as evidenced by neurochemical profiles measured noninvasively in the posterior cingulate cortex and the occipital lobe using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The concentrations of fourteen neurochemicals associated with metabolism, neurotransmission, antioxidant capacity, and cellular structure were measured noninvasively from two distinct brain regions using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Seventeen young adults (age 19–22 years) and sixteen cognitively normal older adults (age 70–88 years) were scanned. To increase sensitivity and specificity, 1H magnetic resonance spectra were obtained at the ultra-high field of 7 T and at ultra-short echo time. The concentrations of neurochemicals were determined using water as an internal reference and accounting for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid content of the volume of interest. In the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), the concentrations of neurochemicals associated with energy (i.e., creatine plus phosphocreatine), membrane turnover (i.e., choline containing compounds), and gliosis (i.e., myo-inositol) were higher in the older adults while the concentrations of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and phosphorylethanolamine (PE) were lower. In the occipital cortex (OCC), the concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal viability, concentrations of the neurotransmitters Glu and NAAG, antioxidant ascorbate (Asc), and PE were lower in the older adults while the concentration of choline containing compounds was higher. Altogether, these findings shed light on how the human brain ages differently depending on region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-177
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience
Volume354
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 23 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [Grant Nos. R01AG039396, P41 EB015894, P30 NS076408] and the W.M. Keck Foundation.

Keywords

  • aging
  • cellular
  • human brain
  • magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • neurochemicals
  • noninvasive

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Region-specific aging of the human brain as evidenced by neurochemical profiles measured noninvasively in the posterior cingulate cortex and the occipital lobe using <sup>1</sup>H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this