Reduction of crystalline iron(III) oxyhydroxides using hydroquinone: Influence of phase and particle size

Amy J. Anschutz, R. Lee Penn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides are common and important materials in the environment, and they strongly impact the biogeochemical cycle of iron and other species at the Earth's surface. These materials commonly occur as nanoparticles in the 3-10 nm size range. This paper presents quantitative results demonstrating that iron oxide reactivity is particle size dependent. The rate and extent of the reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles by hydroquinone in batch experiments were measured as a function of particle identity, particle loading, and hydroquinone concentration. Rates were normalized to surface areas determined by both transmission electron microscopy and Braunauer-Emmett-Teller surface. Results show that surface-area-normalized rates of reductive dissolution are fastest (by as much as 100 times) in experiments using six-line ferrihydrite versus goethite. Furthermore, the surface-area-normalized rates for 4 nm ferrihydrite nanoparticles are up to 20 times faster than the rates for 6 nm ferrihydrite nanoparticles, and the surface-area-normalized rates for 5 × 64 nm goethite nanoparticles are up to two times faster than the rates for 22 × 367 nm goethite nanoparticles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-66
Number of pages7
JournalGeochemical Transactions
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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