Reducing the burden of severe neonatal jaundice in G6PD-deficient populations in low-income countries: are we doing enough?

Bolajoko O. Olusanya, Tina M. Slusher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Severe neonatal jaundice (NNJ) remains an important cause of hospitalisation in the first week of life particularly in developing countries where glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is prevalent. NNJ is seldom associated with mortality when closely monitored but portends significant long-term risks in settings where hospitals are ill-equipped to provide phototherapy or exchange blood transfusion. Early detection in high-risk populations is an important first step towards redressing the current lack of global initiatives on NNJ. Investment in the development of low-cost bilirubin monitoring devices, functional phototherapy units at first-level health facilities and improved care-seeking practices are also essential, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-24
Number of pages3
JournalInternational health
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Neonatal Jaundice
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase
Poverty
Phototherapy
low income
hospitalization
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency
mortality
Africa South of the Sahara
Health Facilities
developing country
monitoring
Bilirubin
Blood Transfusion
Developing Countries
Health Status
cause
lack
Hospitalization
costs

Keywords

  • Africa
  • G6PD
  • Global disease burden
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia
  • Neonatal jaundice
  • Perinatal morbidity

Cite this

Reducing the burden of severe neonatal jaundice in G6PD-deficient populations in low-income countries : are we doing enough? / Olusanya, Bolajoko O.; Slusher, Tina M.

In: International health, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 22-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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