Reducing self-control depletion effects through enhanced sensitivity to implementation: Evidence from fMRI and behavioral studies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research suggests self-control relies on a limited set of resources that can be diminished by use. Recent theories posit that there are two stages of self-control: recognizing the need for control and implementing controlled responses. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment and an intervention experiment to investigate whether one or both stages were affected by the prior exercise of self-control. Results from both experiments indicated that only the implementation stage was affected. Further, we demonstrate that self-control can be increased by an intervention designed to boost implementation, as opposed to the recognition of the need to control one's responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)486-495
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

Keywords

  • Decision neuroscience
  • FMRI
  • Regulatory resource depletion
  • Self-control

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