Reducing craving and consumption in individuals with drug addiction, obesity or overeating through neuromodulation intervention: a systematic review and meta-analysis of its follow-up effects

Sensen Song, Anna Zilverstand, Wenjun Gui, Xuefei Pan, Xiaolin Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Non-invasive brain stimulation has shown potential in clinical applications aiming at reducing craving and consumption levels in individuals with drug addiction or overeating behaviour. However, it is unclear whether these intervention effects are maintained over time. This study aimed to measure the immediate, short- and long-term effects of excitatory transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting at dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in people with drug addiction or overeating.

METHODS: A systematic review and random effects meta-analysis. We included 20 articles (total of 22 studies using randomized controlled trials: 3 alcohol dependence, 3 drug dependence, 12 smoking, 4 overeating; total: 720 participants) from January 2000 to June 2020, which reported at least one follow-up assessment of craving, consumption or abstinence levels after the intervention. We compared effects of active versus sham stimulation immediately after the intervention and at the last follow-up assessment, as compared with baseline.

RESULTS: Excitatory neuromodulation of dlPFC activity reduced craving and consumption immediately after the intervention (craving: g = 0.734, CI = 0.447-1.021, P < 0.001; consumption: g = 0.527, CI = 0.309-0.745; P < 0.001), as well as during short-, mid- and long-term abstinence (craving: g = 0.677, CI = 0.440-0.914, P < 0.001; consumption: g = 0.445, CI = 0.245-0.645, P < 0.001; abstinence levels: g = 0.698, CI = 0.433-0.963, P < 0.001; average time of follow-up: 84 ± 83 days after last stimulation). Additional analysis demonstrated that the intervention effects were sustained in all populations studied (food, nicotine, alcohol or drug abuse) and with both stimulation techniques used (rTMS, tDCS). Interventions targeting at the left (vs right) hemisphere may be more effective.

CONCLUSIONS: Excitatory neuromodulation targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex appears to lead to a sustained reduction of craving and consumption in individuals with addiction or overeating behaviour.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAddiction
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank all authors of the original individual studies who kindly provided their data for current meta‐analysis. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31630034, 71942001).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Society for the Study of Addiction

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • brain stimulation
  • dlPFC
  • eating disorders
  • neuromodulation
  • rTMS
  • tDCS

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

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