Red, blue and purple states of mind: Segmenting the political marketplace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

John Jost (2017 – this issue) provides a thoughtful review of the literature in political psychology that speaks to important distinctions between conservatives and progressives. I use his essay as a point of departure to accomplish three goals: a) further elaborate on the left/right segmentation scheme, identifying other portions of the political market that are less brand loyal and therefore more persuadable; b) offer preliminary suggestions based on consumer psychology perspectives on how voter attitudes and behaviors might be nudged by political candidates and campaigns; and c) identify some areas in which the fields of political and consumer psychology might profitably benefit from cross-pollination of theories, approaches and evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-531
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Psychology
Pollination
Consumer psychology
Vote
Segmentation

Keywords

  • Conservatism
  • Consumer psychology
  • Political psychology
  • Progressivism
  • Segmentation

Cite this

Red, blue and purple states of mind : Segmenting the political marketplace. / Rao, Akshay R.

In: Journal of Consumer Psychology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.10.2017, p. 521-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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