Recruitment strategies for predominantly low-income, multi-racial/ethnic children and parents to 3-year community-based intervention trials: Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium

Zhaohui Cui, Kimberly P. Truesdale, Thomas N. Robinson, Victoria Pemberton, Simone A French, Juan Escarfuller, Terri L. Casey, Anne M. Hotop, Donna Matheson, Charlotte A. Pratt, Lynn J. Lotas, Eli Po'E, Sharon Andrisin, Dianne S. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The recruitment of participants into community-based randomized controlled trials studying childhood obesity is often challenging, especially from low-income racial/ethnical minorities and when long-term participant commitments are required. This paper describes strategies used to recruit and enroll predominately low-income racial/ethnic minority parents and children into the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) consortium. Methods: The COPTR consortium has run four independent 3-year, multi-level (individual, family, school, clinic, and community) community-based randomized controlled trials. Two were prevention trials in preschool children and the other two were treatment trials in pre-adolescents and adolescent youth. All trials reported monthly participant recruitment numbers using a standardized method over the projected 18-24 months of recruitment. After randomization of participants was completed, recruitment staff and investigators from each trial retrospectively completed a survey of recruitment strategies and their perceived top three recruitment strategies and barriers. Results: Recruitment was completed in 15-21 months across trials, enrolling a total of 1745 parent-child dyads- out of 6314 screened. The number of children screened per randomized child was 4.6 and 3.5 in the two prevention trials, and 3.1 and 2.5 in the two treatment trials. Recruitment strategies reported included: (1) careful planning, (2) working with trusting community partners, (3) hiring recruitment staff who were culturally sensitive, personality appropriate, and willing to work flexible hours, (4) contacting potential participants actively and repeatedly, (5) recruiting at times and locations convenient for participants, (6) providing incentives to participants to complete baseline measures, (7) using a tracking database, (8) evaluating whether participants understand the activities and expectations of the study, and (9) assessing participants' motivation for participating. Working with community partners, hiring culturally sensitive staff, and contacting potential participants repeatedly were cited by two trials among their top three strategies. The requirement of a 3-year commitment to the trial was cited by two trials to be among the top three recruitment barriers. Conclusions: Comprehensive strategies that include community partnership support, culturally sensitive recruitment staff, and repeated contacts with potential participants can result in successful recruitment of low-income racial/ethnic minority families into obesity prevention and treatment trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number296
JournalTrials
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2019

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Pediatric Obesity
Parents
Research
Motivation
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Preschool Children
Random Allocation
Personality
Obesity
Research Personnel
Databases

Keywords

  • African American
  • Barrier
  • Children
  • Hispanic
  • Intervention
  • Low-income
  • Minority
  • Parent-child dyads
  • Recruitment
  • Strategy

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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Recruitment strategies for predominantly low-income, multi-racial/ethnic children and parents to 3-year community-based intervention trials : Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium. / Cui, Zhaohui; Truesdale, Kimberly P.; Robinson, Thomas N.; Pemberton, Victoria; French, Simone A; Escarfuller, Juan; Casey, Terri L.; Hotop, Anne M.; Matheson, Donna; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Lotas, Lynn J.; Po'E, Eli; Andrisin, Sharon; Ward, Dianne S.

In: Trials, Vol. 20, No. 1, 296, 28.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cui, Z, Truesdale, KP, Robinson, TN, Pemberton, V, French, SA, Escarfuller, J, Casey, TL, Hotop, AM, Matheson, D, Pratt, CA, Lotas, LJ, Po'E, E, Andrisin, S & Ward, DS 2019, 'Recruitment strategies for predominantly low-income, multi-racial/ethnic children and parents to 3-year community-based intervention trials: Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium', Trials, vol. 20, no. 1, 296. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3418-0
Cui, Zhaohui ; Truesdale, Kimberly P. ; Robinson, Thomas N. ; Pemberton, Victoria ; French, Simone A ; Escarfuller, Juan ; Casey, Terri L. ; Hotop, Anne M. ; Matheson, Donna ; Pratt, Charlotte A. ; Lotas, Lynn J. ; Po'E, Eli ; Andrisin, Sharon ; Ward, Dianne S. / Recruitment strategies for predominantly low-income, multi-racial/ethnic children and parents to 3-year community-based intervention trials : Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium. In: Trials. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: The recruitment of participants into community-based randomized controlled trials studying childhood obesity is often challenging, especially from low-income racial/ethnical minorities and when long-term participant commitments are required. This paper describes strategies used to recruit and enroll predominately low-income racial/ethnic minority parents and children into the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) consortium. Methods: The COPTR consortium has run four independent 3-year, multi-level (individual, family, school, clinic, and community) community-based randomized controlled trials. Two were prevention trials in preschool children and the other two were treatment trials in pre-adolescents and adolescent youth. All trials reported monthly participant recruitment numbers using a standardized method over the projected 18-24 months of recruitment. After randomization of participants was completed, recruitment staff and investigators from each trial retrospectively completed a survey of recruitment strategies and their perceived top three recruitment strategies and barriers. Results: Recruitment was completed in 15-21 months across trials, enrolling a total of 1745 parent-child dyads- out of 6314 screened. The number of children screened per randomized child was 4.6 and 3.5 in the two prevention trials, and 3.1 and 2.5 in the two treatment trials. Recruitment strategies reported included: (1) careful planning, (2) working with trusting community partners, (3) hiring recruitment staff who were culturally sensitive, personality appropriate, and willing to work flexible hours, (4) contacting potential participants actively and repeatedly, (5) recruiting at times and locations convenient for participants, (6) providing incentives to participants to complete baseline measures, (7) using a tracking database, (8) evaluating whether participants understand the activities and expectations of the study, and (9) assessing participants' motivation for participating. Working with community partners, hiring culturally sensitive staff, and contacting potential participants repeatedly were cited by two trials among their top three strategies. The requirement of a 3-year commitment to the trial was cited by two trials to be among the top three recruitment barriers. Conclusions: Comprehensive strategies that include community partnership support, culturally sensitive recruitment staff, and repeated contacts with potential participants can result in successful recruitment of low-income racial/ethnic minority families into obesity prevention and treatment trials.",
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author = "Zhaohui Cui and Truesdale, {Kimberly P.} and Robinson, {Thomas N.} and Victoria Pemberton and French, {Simone A} and Juan Escarfuller and Casey, {Terri L.} and Hotop, {Anne M.} and Donna Matheson and Pratt, {Charlotte A.} and Lotas, {Lynn J.} and Eli Po'E and Sharon Andrisin and Ward, {Dianne S.}",
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T1 - Recruitment strategies for predominantly low-income, multi-racial/ethnic children and parents to 3-year community-based intervention trials

T2 - Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium

AU - Cui, Zhaohui

AU - Truesdale, Kimberly P.

AU - Robinson, Thomas N.

AU - Pemberton, Victoria

AU - French, Simone A

AU - Escarfuller, Juan

AU - Casey, Terri L.

AU - Hotop, Anne M.

AU - Matheson, Donna

AU - Pratt, Charlotte A.

AU - Lotas, Lynn J.

AU - Po'E, Eli

AU - Andrisin, Sharon

AU - Ward, Dianne S.

PY - 2019/5/28

Y1 - 2019/5/28

N2 - Background: The recruitment of participants into community-based randomized controlled trials studying childhood obesity is often challenging, especially from low-income racial/ethnical minorities and when long-term participant commitments are required. This paper describes strategies used to recruit and enroll predominately low-income racial/ethnic minority parents and children into the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) consortium. Methods: The COPTR consortium has run four independent 3-year, multi-level (individual, family, school, clinic, and community) community-based randomized controlled trials. Two were prevention trials in preschool children and the other two were treatment trials in pre-adolescents and adolescent youth. All trials reported monthly participant recruitment numbers using a standardized method over the projected 18-24 months of recruitment. After randomization of participants was completed, recruitment staff and investigators from each trial retrospectively completed a survey of recruitment strategies and their perceived top three recruitment strategies and barriers. Results: Recruitment was completed in 15-21 months across trials, enrolling a total of 1745 parent-child dyads- out of 6314 screened. The number of children screened per randomized child was 4.6 and 3.5 in the two prevention trials, and 3.1 and 2.5 in the two treatment trials. Recruitment strategies reported included: (1) careful planning, (2) working with trusting community partners, (3) hiring recruitment staff who were culturally sensitive, personality appropriate, and willing to work flexible hours, (4) contacting potential participants actively and repeatedly, (5) recruiting at times and locations convenient for participants, (6) providing incentives to participants to complete baseline measures, (7) using a tracking database, (8) evaluating whether participants understand the activities and expectations of the study, and (9) assessing participants' motivation for participating. Working with community partners, hiring culturally sensitive staff, and contacting potential participants repeatedly were cited by two trials among their top three strategies. The requirement of a 3-year commitment to the trial was cited by two trials to be among the top three recruitment barriers. Conclusions: Comprehensive strategies that include community partnership support, culturally sensitive recruitment staff, and repeated contacts with potential participants can result in successful recruitment of low-income racial/ethnic minority families into obesity prevention and treatment trials.

AB - Background: The recruitment of participants into community-based randomized controlled trials studying childhood obesity is often challenging, especially from low-income racial/ethnical minorities and when long-term participant commitments are required. This paper describes strategies used to recruit and enroll predominately low-income racial/ethnic minority parents and children into the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) consortium. Methods: The COPTR consortium has run four independent 3-year, multi-level (individual, family, school, clinic, and community) community-based randomized controlled trials. Two were prevention trials in preschool children and the other two were treatment trials in pre-adolescents and adolescent youth. All trials reported monthly participant recruitment numbers using a standardized method over the projected 18-24 months of recruitment. After randomization of participants was completed, recruitment staff and investigators from each trial retrospectively completed a survey of recruitment strategies and their perceived top three recruitment strategies and barriers. Results: Recruitment was completed in 15-21 months across trials, enrolling a total of 1745 parent-child dyads- out of 6314 screened. The number of children screened per randomized child was 4.6 and 3.5 in the two prevention trials, and 3.1 and 2.5 in the two treatment trials. Recruitment strategies reported included: (1) careful planning, (2) working with trusting community partners, (3) hiring recruitment staff who were culturally sensitive, personality appropriate, and willing to work flexible hours, (4) contacting potential participants actively and repeatedly, (5) recruiting at times and locations convenient for participants, (6) providing incentives to participants to complete baseline measures, (7) using a tracking database, (8) evaluating whether participants understand the activities and expectations of the study, and (9) assessing participants' motivation for participating. Working with community partners, hiring culturally sensitive staff, and contacting potential participants repeatedly were cited by two trials among their top three strategies. The requirement of a 3-year commitment to the trial was cited by two trials to be among the top three recruitment barriers. Conclusions: Comprehensive strategies that include community partnership support, culturally sensitive recruitment staff, and repeated contacts with potential participants can result in successful recruitment of low-income racial/ethnic minority families into obesity prevention and treatment trials.

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KW - Barrier

KW - Children

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KW - Intervention

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KW - Minority

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KW - Recruitment

KW - Strategy

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