Recruiting for a randomized controlled trial from an ethnically diverse population: lessons from the Maternal Infection and Preterm Labor Study.

Jennifer L. Welsh, Pita Adam, Patricia Fontaine, Dwenda K Gjerdingen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare recruitment rates for Caucasians and minorities in a randomized, controlled trial based in a family practice residency clinic. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective chart review of all patients eligible for the Maternal Infection and Preterm Labor (MIPTL) study. POPULATION: All prenatal patients at 1 clinic site presenting for care at earlier than 34 weeks gestation. RESULTS: African-American patients were recruited at the same rate as Caucasians (28% of each eligible population). Immigrants and patients requiring a translator were less likely to enroll (P =.014 and.008, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Clinic-based research studies in a family practice residency program can successfully recruit African-American patients. Immigration status and the ability to speak English were important factors impacting participation. More research is needed to understand the role of clinic-based research in recruitment of minorities for clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalThe Journal of family practice
Volume51
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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