Recovery of strength is dependent on mTORC1 signaling after eccentric muscle injury

Cory W Baumann, Russell George Rogers, Jeffrey Scott Otis, Christopher Paul Ingalls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Eccentric contractions may cause immediate and long-term reductions in muscle strength that can be recovered through increased protein synthesis rates. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the mechanistic target-of-rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a vital controller of protein synthesis rates, is required for return of muscle strength after injury. Methods: Isometric muscle strength was assessed before, immediately after, and then 3, 7, and 14 days after a single bout of 150 eccentric contractions in mice that received daily injections of saline or rapamycin. Results: The bout of eccentric contractions increased the phosphorylation of mTORC1 (1.8-fold) and p70s6k1 (13.8-fold), mTORC1's downstream effector, 3 days post-injury. Rapamycin blocked mTORC1 and p70s6k1 phosphorylation and attenuated recovery of muscle strength (∼20%) at 7 and 14 days. Conclusion: mTORC1 signaling is instrumental in the return of muscle strength after a single bout of eccentric contractions in mice. Muscle Nerve 54: 914–924, 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)914-924
Number of pages11
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Muscle Strength
Muscles
Wounds and Injuries
Sirolimus
Phosphorylation
Proteins
mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1
Injections

Keywords

  • eccentric contractions
  • mouse
  • recovery
  • skeletal muscle
  • torque

Cite this

Baumann, C. W., Rogers, R. G., Otis, J. S., & Ingalls, C. P. (2016). Recovery of strength is dependent on mTORC1 signaling after eccentric muscle injury. Muscle and Nerve, 54(5), 914-924. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.25121

Recovery of strength is dependent on mTORC1 signaling after eccentric muscle injury. / Baumann, Cory W; Rogers, Russell George; Otis, Jeffrey Scott; Ingalls, Christopher Paul.

In: Muscle and Nerve, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 914-924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baumann, CW, Rogers, RG, Otis, JS & Ingalls, CP 2016, 'Recovery of strength is dependent on mTORC1 signaling after eccentric muscle injury', Muscle and Nerve, vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 914-924. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.25121
Baumann, Cory W ; Rogers, Russell George ; Otis, Jeffrey Scott ; Ingalls, Christopher Paul. / Recovery of strength is dependent on mTORC1 signaling after eccentric muscle injury. In: Muscle and Nerve. 2016 ; Vol. 54, No. 5. pp. 914-924.
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