Recent health-related quality of life, but not change, predicted mortality and healthcare utilization

Jasvinder A. Singh, David B. Nelson, Kristin L. Nichol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether change in HRQOL over a seven-year period was associated with subsequent mortality and hospitalization, after adjusting for important covariates, in a cohort of U.S. Veterans. Methods: We used data from a cohort of Veterans who completed a HRQOL survey in 1998 (Short-Form 36 for Veterans [SF-36V]) and a 2006 follow-up (SF-12V) HRQOL survey and SF12V scores were calculated at both time-points. We used logistic regression analyses to model the relationship between changes in the SF12-V physical component (PCS) and mental health component (MCS) scores and 1-year hospitalization and 1-year and 3.3-year mortality after the 2006 follow-up survey. Results: 13,900 participants provided data for both the initial and follow-up surveys. We found no significant associations between changes in PCS or MCS and one-year hospitalization after adjusting for follow-up HRQOL and other covariates. We found significant but relatively weak associations between changes in MCS and our mortality outcomes. Conclusion: Given the follow-up MCS and PCS, change in PCS over the previous 7 years added little information for predicting mortality and hospitalization Although the change in MCS added some information for predicting mortality. Therefore, knowledge of patient's current HRQOL generally provides meaningful information for predicting subsequent mortality and hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-21
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume140
Early online dateAug 22 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Grant support: This study was funded by a grant from the VA Upper Midwest Veterans Network. Dr. Singh is also supported by the resources and the use of facilities at the VA Medical Center at Birmingham, Alabama.

Funding Information:
Grant support: This study was funded by a grant from the VA Upper Midwest Veterans Network. Dr. Singh is also supported by the resources and the use of facilities at the VA Medical Center at Birmingham, Alabama. Funding: The funding sources had no role in study conception, protocol development, data analyses, manuscript preparation or decision to submit. These decisions were made solely by the authors. Conflict of interest: JAS has received consultant fees from Crealta/Horizon, Medisys, Fidia, PK Med, Two labs Inc, Adept Field Solutions, Clinical Care options, Clearview healthcare partners, Putnam associates, Focus forward, Navigant consulting, Spherix, MedIQ, Jupiter Life Science, UBM LLC, Trio Health, Medscape, WebMD, and Practice Point communications; and the National Institutes of Health and the American College of Rheumatology. JAS owns stock options in TPT Global Tech, Vaxart pharmaceuticals, Atyu biopharma and Charlotte's Web Holdings, Inc. JAS previously owned stock options in Amarin, Viking and Moderna pharmaceuticals. JAS is on the speaker's bureau of Simply Speaking. JAS is a member of the executive of Outcomes Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT), an organization that develops outcome measures in rheumatology and receives arms-length funding from 12 companies. JAS serves on the FDA Arthritis Advisory Committee. JAS is the chair of the Veterans Affairs Rheumatology Field Advisory Committee. JAS is the editor and the Director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group Satellite Center on Network Meta-analysis. JAS previously served as a member of the following committees: member, the American College of Rheumatology's (ACR) Annual Meeting Planning Committee (AMPC) and Quality of Care Committees, the Chair of the ACR Meet-the-Professor, Workshop and Study Group Subcommittee and the co-chair of the ACR Criteria and Response Criteria subcommittee. Drs. Nichol and Nelson have no relevant conflicts to declare.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • Death
  • HRQOL
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Healthcare utilization
  • Hospitalization
  • Prediction
  • Veteran

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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