Rebuilding Finance’s “Action Man” through CNBC’s The Closing Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CNBC’s The Closing Bell contributed to the expansion of finance capital in the late twentieth century through its televisual emphasis on incremental market change that functions affectively to call for action. Such emphasis on short-term stock movement was called into question during the 2008 global financial crisis. However, detailed analysis demonstrates that The Closing Bell did not alter course. I argue that its ongoing focus on incremental movement has worked affectively to shore up a masculinized culture of finance during a period that demanded structural reform.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)702-719
Number of pages18
JournalTelevision and New Media
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

finance
structural reform
financial crisis
twentieth century
market
Action Man
Finance
Rebuilding
Finance Capital
Global Financial Crisis

Keywords

  • CNBC
  • affect
  • cable news
  • finance
  • gender
  • televisuality

Cite this

Rebuilding Finance’s “Action Man” through CNBC’s The Closing Bell. / Cormany, Diane L.

In: Television and New Media, Vol. 20, No. 7, 01.11.2019, p. 702-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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