Reaching the limits: A geographic approach for understanding food insecurity and household hunger mitigation strategies in Minneapolis-Saint Paul, USA

Joel Larson, William G. Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research on hunger and food security in the Global South and the Global North has often emphasized different factors and scales of analyses. Unlike newer monitoring systems in the Global South, which evolved substantially following critiques by Amartya Sen, US food security research has rarely combined the two dimensions of food availability and food access. Furthermore, this research has paid scant attention to household coping strategies. This study responds to this lacuna in US hunger research by developing a spatial model for predicting risk to food insecurity based on proxy measures for access (three demographic variables) and availability (grocery store density). The study then employs qualitative methodologies (surveys and semi-structured interviews) to understand household coping strategies in two ethnically distinct areas in Minneapolis-Saint Paul at risk to food insecurity. One neighborhood is dominated by Southeast Asian and East African immigrants and the other by African-Americans. This approach should allow for better targeting of food aid and programs that help alleviate food insecurity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalGeoJournal
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Coping strategies
  • Food security
  • Hunger
  • Spatial modeling

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