Rapid joule heating improves vitrification based cryopreservation

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cryopreservation by vitrification has far-reaching implications. However, rewarming techniques that are rapid and scalable (both in throughput and biosystem size) for low concentrations of cryoprotective agent (CPA) for reduced toxicity are lacking, limiting the potential for translation. Here, we introduce a joule heating–based platform technology, whereby biosystems are rapidly rewarmed by contact with an electrical conductor that is fed a voltage pulse. We demonstrate successful cryopreservation of three model biosystems with thicknesses across three orders of magnitude, including adherent cells (~4 µm), Drosophila melanogaster embryos (~50 µm) and rat kidney slices (~1.2 mm) using low CPA concentrations (2–4 M). Using tunable voltage pulse widths from 10 µs to 100 ms, numerical simulation predicts that warming rates from 5 × 104 to 6 × 108 °C/min can be achieved. Altogether, our results present a general solution to the cryopreservation of a broad spectrum of cellular, organismal and tissue-based biosystems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6017
JournalNature communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Anthony Chen for the help with the experiments and the UMN Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) for technical assistance with hematoxylin and eosin histology. The authors thank Baterdene Namsrai and Srivasupradha Ramesh for the help with kidney slice preparation. This work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (EEC 1941543 to J. B.) and National Institutes of Health (R21OD028758 to J. B and T. H., R01DK117425 to J.B.; and R01HL135046 to J.B.; NIH GM R01GM044757 to T.H.); and the Kuhrmeyer Chair in Mechanical Engineering and the Bakken Chair in the Institute for Engineering in Medicine from the University of Minnesota to J.B.

Funding Information:
The authors thank Anthony Chen for the help with the experiments and the UMN Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) for technical assistance with hematoxylin and eosin histology. The authors thank Baterdene Namsrai and Srivasupradha Ramesh for the help with kidney slice preparation. This work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (EEC 1941543 to J. B.) and National Institutes of Health (R21OD028758 to J. B and T. H., R01DK117425 to J.B.; and R01HL135046 to J.B.; NIH GM R01GM044757 to T.H.); and the Kuhrmeyer Chair in Mechanical Engineering and the Bakken Chair in the Institute for Engineering in Medicine from the University of Minnesota to J.B.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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